Beloit & Beyond Conference, November 3, 2021

Names of presenters link to their abstract. The bar below the abstract links back here.

Additional events
11:00-12:30
Study-Abroad Fair in Moore Lounge
11:00-4:00
Faces of Friendship; Faces of Resilience in the Neese Gallery, Wright Museum of Art, 2nd floor
2:45-4:00
Channels Involvement Fair in the Powerhouse 2nd floor
5:00-7:00
Local to Global Networking Fair in the Science Center atrium
 
Career Works, Pearsons Hall
 
Job Search Escape Room
 
Drop in
11:00-4:00
Linked-Out: Career Works Escape Room
 
Greenhouse, Science Center
 
Greenhouse Open House
Moderator: Deb Lynch, Greenhouse/Biology
Deb Lynch
Opening remarks
Drop in
1:00-2:30
Campus Greenhouse Open House
Drop in
1:00-2:30
Greenhouse Open House
 
Kresge Theatre
 
Theatre Tech Olympics
Moderator: Alicia Bailey, Shelbi Wilkin, Theatre and Dance
Alicia Bailey, Shelbi Wilkin
Opening remarks
10:00-10:50
Are You Smarter Than A Theatre Student?
 
CELEB MakerLab, Downtown Beloit
 
Drop in
1:00-3:00
Sparked by Curiosity, Fueled by Creativity: The Maker Lab
 
Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall
 
Moderator: Charles Westerberg, Sociology
8:30
Charles Westerberg
Opening remarks
8:35-9:00
Social Media, Reproductive Rights, and the Future of Activism
9:00-9:25
Media Framing, Sentencing Policies, and Black Criminality
9:25-9:50
Black Lives Matter: How Social Media Advances the Message
 
Moderator: Beth Dougherty, Political Science
Beth Dougherty
Opening remarks
10:00-10:25
Injustices and Inaccessibility in the Court System: Reflections from a Legal Self-Help Center
10:25-10:50
Delhi Under Siege: The Indian Farmers Protest
 
Moderator: Leslie Williams, Anthropology
12:30
Leslie Williams
Opening remarks
12:35-1:00
Turtle Tunes: Musical Outreach in Beloit
1:00-1:25
Community Action PREP PhotoVoice Project
1:25-1:50
Archaeological Field School and the Unique Value of Firsthand Experience
 
Moderator: Emily Sager, Career Works
Emily Sager
Opening remarks
2:00-2:25
The Value of Corporate and Nonprofit Internships
2:00-2:25
The Value of Corporate and Nonprofit Internships
2:25-2:50
Internship at SCAN Health Plan
 
Room 150, Science Center
 
Moderator: Scott Bierman, Office of the President
8:30
Scott Bierman
Opening remarks
8:35-9:00
Leaders Create More Leaders: How Beloit College Inspires Leadership
9:00-9:25
The Hard Work of Being Lazy
9:25-9:50
United States Congress: Internships and Opportunities
 
Moderator: Kristin Labby, Chemistry
Kristin Labby
Opening remarks
10:00-10:50
Roundtable: Student Experiences in Healthcare
 
Moderator: Pablo Toral, Political Science
12:30
Pablo Toral
Opening remarks
12:35-1:00
Exploring My Wilderness: Personal, Academic, and Professional Things I Learned on Trail in the Boundary Water Canoe Wilderness Area
1:00-1:25
The Mining-Conservation Divide in Ely, MN
1:25-1:50
Writing Wilderness: Poets on Boats
 
Room 249, Science Center
 
Moderator: Jessica Fox-Wilson, Career Works
8:30
Jessica Fox-Wilson
Opening remarks
8:35-9:00
What I Gained from Summer Internships in Renewable Energy and Environmental Education
9:00-9:25
Green Summer at the Milwaukee VA Medical Center
9:25-9:50
Being Pre-Med Through a Computer
 
Moderator: Tamara Ketabgian, English
Tamara Ketabgian
Opening remarks
10:00-10:50
From English to an Internship in Sports, Human Rights, or Social Justice
 
Moderator: Tawnya Cary, Biology
12:30
Tawnya Cary
Opening remarks
12:35-1:00
Cold Weather Teams in the National Football League and Home-Field Advantage
1:00-1:25
Classifying spam YouTube comments using Natural Language Processing
1:25-1:50
Osteological Lesions and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Archaeological Remains in Relation to their Burial Conditions
 
Moderator: Tamara Ketabgian, English
Tamara Ketabgian
Opening remarks
2:00-2:50
Beloit Students for a Sustainable Campus
 
Room 349, Science Center
 
Moderator: Jingjing Lou, Education and Youth Studies
8:30
Jingjing Lou
Opening remarks
8:35-9:00
Using Zoom as a Tool for Research in Social and Developmental Psychology
9:00-9:25
Lessons about Schooling during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Going Back or Moving Forward?
9:25-9:50
Music and Language Development in the Modern Classroom: Teachers’ Perspectives during a Pandemic
 
Moderator: Angi Olesen, LEADS
Angi Olesen
Opening remarks
10:00-10:50
Pursuing Campus Leadership Opportunities
Moderator: Athena Tate, LITS
12:30
Athena Tate
Opening remarks
12:35-1:00
Learning Beyond the Classroom at LITS
1:00-1:25
Teaching Kids Programming at iD Tech
1:25-1:50
Making the most of your work-study at Beloit College!
 
Moderator: Nicolette Meister, Logan Museum of Anthropology
Nicolette Meister
Opening remarks
2:00-2:50
Informational Interviews with Beloit Museum Studies Alumni
 
Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall
 
Moderator: Daniel Youd, Modern Languages and Literatures
8:30
Daniel Youd
Opening remarks
8:35-9:00
My Journey of Applying to Physical Therapy Schools
9:00-9:25
Cardinals of Success from Summer
9:25-9:50
How to Apply and Make the Most out of an REU Program
 
Moderator: Carol Wickersham, Sociology
Carol Wickersham
Opening remarks
10:00-10:50
Learning from the Community through the Duffy Community Partnerships
 
Moderator: Ellen Joyce, History
12:30
Ellen Joyce
Opening remarks
12:35-1:10
AST and Beyond: A Leadership Experience Panel from the Alpha Sigma Tau Sorority
1:10-1:45
SHE-CAN Weissberg Scholars at Beloit College
 
Moderator: Haley Lott, LITS
Haley Lott
Opening remarks
2:00-2:50
Beloiter to Fulbrighter
 

Abstracts

Room 150, Science Center, 8:35-9:00
Sponsor: H. Bierman


Deepakshi Bhardwaj '22
New Delhi, India
Majors: International Relations; Business Economics

Leaders Create More Leaders: How Beloit College Inspires Leadership

 The circumstances of today’s world have proved that good leadership is required to move people towards common goals. Beloit College has always taught and inspired leadership in its students. This presentation deconstructs the way in which Beloit College creates opportunity to learn this crucial skill and expands the definition of leadership.

 Through my personal trajectory, I will discuss the way in which Beloit College builds leaders. It will focus on the opportunities that were made available since my freshman year and how each opportunity had a deep lesson in leadership. My journey from being a part of the learning leadership series with the then Director of SEAL, to becoming a Resident Assistant, to now serving as the Co-President of the Beloit Student Government is a great example of how being intentional about seeking certain skills at Beloit allows for substantial growth. The presentation will have an emphasis on the ways in which these opportunities were found and made the most out of. Most importantly, this presentation will be a testimony to the commitment of Beloit College to cherishing the individuality of its students and viewing it as a strength when it comes to inspiring leadership.

Kresge Theatre, 10:00-10:50
Sponsors: Alicia Bailey and Shelbi Wilkin


Connie Bronson '22
Aurora, Illinois
Majors: Theatre Production; CRIS
Minor: French

Isabel Chavez '22
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Theatre
Minor: Anthropology

Olivia Taylor '22
San Diego, California
Majors: Theatre Production; International Relations
Minors: African Studies; French

Are You Smarter Than A Theatre Student?

 As seniors at Beloit College, the three of us have been involved in many aspects of theatre; however, as time has passed, we have each chosen our own niche and skill set to focus on. Olivia has chosen to pursue costuming, Isabel has chosen stage management, and Connie has chosen scenic carpentry. In our presentation we will be speaking on how our experiences in the theatre department at Beloit have helped us in our journey towards being theatre professionals. We will be hosting a small contest during the event for our audience to try their hand at some of the skills we’ve learned. The winner of the contest will get a prize!

 The "Tech Olympics" contest will include:

 Quick Changes

 Knot Tying

 Props Organization

 Spike Taping

 Light Hanging/Focusing

 Longest Tape Measure Extension

 These events are easy to manage, prep for, and fun for non-theatre people to take part in.

Room 349, Science Center, 10:00-10:50
Sponsor: Angi Olesen


Shruthi Chandrasekar '23
Chennai, India
Major: Psychology
Minor: Literary Studies

Moon West '23
Nashville, Tennessee
Majors: Psychology; Education
Minor: English

Saumyaa Gupta '24
Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
Majors: Political Science; Psychology
Minor: Law and Justice

Juliet Schmidt '22
Chicago, Illinois
Majors: Music; Psychology

Cam Meiers '23
Beloit, Wisconsin
Major: Theatre Performance

Pursuing Campus Leadership Opportunities

 This roundtable features Beloit College students who have occupied a wide array of leadership roles on campus, from student clubs and organizations to paraprofessional work in various offices to involvement in community outreach programming. Through their leadership experiences, these students gained skills in communication, collaboration, problem solving, and navigating interpersonal relationships.

Greenhouse, Science Center, Drop in
1:00-2:30
Sponsor: Deb Lynch


Yessenia Cruz '23
Richmond, California
Major: Biology

Greenhouse Open House

 The Beloit College Greenhouse offers student workers hands-on learning through caretaking of over seventy individual plants belonging to thirty-five families. The Staghorn Fern was added to the plant collection in 1964. Other plants, including the fiddleleaf fig, night-blooming cereus, and crown of thorns, are more than thirty years old. Plants are divided between 1600 square feet of growing zones that include tropical with a working pond, succulent/cacti, temperate, a small lab, and head house. The Greenhouse Tour includes the Greenhouse itself, the chance to ask questions, and hands-on activities with seeds, plants, and potting.

 As the Lead Greenhouse Assistant, every day I work at taking care of the plants and making sure the fish in the pond are doing okay. When I first arrived, I knew I had a lot of work ahead of me, because the greenhouse was not in its best condition. It was not very well taken care of during the summer. I was a little scared because even though I had some experience with taking care of plants, there was a lot I did not know. I had many plants to take care of and I didn’t want to mess up, but with the help of my co-workers and Deb I learned a lot about caring for plants, so I am a lot more confident in my work. I have learned how to effectively water plants, scout for pests, control weeds without any chemicals, and repot plants.

 Now that the greenhouse is looking a lot better, I get a sense of accomplishment when I see that the plants are growing well. I would love to share with my peers the hard work my coworkers and I have accomplished in order to give them a sense of what it would be like to work with plants in the future.

 During the Beloit and Beyond Conference, we will host a tour of the Greenhouse where students can ask questions about what it is like being a student worker. Students will learn how to get involved in caring for the Greenhouse. We will also have hands-on activities like potting and planting seeds.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 9:00-9:25
Sponsor: Charles Westerberg


Jada Daniel '23
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Political Science, Sociology, Critical Identity Studies
Minor: N/A

Media Framing, Sentencing Policies, and Black Criminality

 African Americans and Hispanics constitute 32% of the U.S. population, yet they make up 56% of the nation’s incarcerated population. My research seeks to identify and measure factors that contribute to these disparate outcomes in the criminal justice system for people of color. The primary focus of my project is on media framing and its impact on sentencing policies. I also highlight the ways that the print media’s depictions of Black criminality shape changes in sentencing policy. Media Framing in the context of criminal justice is the reproduction of narratives and frameworks that influence culture, indoctrinate the public with distorted configurations of crime and punishment, and alters realities to influence outcomes.

 To gauge the extent of media framing and how it propagates mass incarceration, sentencing disparities, and more punitive policies, I conducted an ethnographic content analysis of articles from the Chicago Tribune. I measured the degree to which media framing’s influence on sentencing and criminal justice policy can be seen through patterns in how information is presented. My results suggest that the articles could be organized into six major frameworks. Each article was analyzed and coded using the following frames: Fear and Public Safety, Deterrence, Just Deserts Punishment (Eye for an Eye), Rehabilitation, Criminalization of the Poor, Black, and Brown, and Pathos Appeals.

 The findings of my analysis provide evidence that there is media framing of criminal justice policy and that its rhetoric, as well as the violent distortions it produces, lacks a focus on rehabilitation, transformative justice, treatment, and re-entry. I argue that the way criminal justice policy is framed by the media causes sentencing policies and the American carceral state to be more punitive toward people of color.

Room 249, Science Center, 8:35-9:00
Sponsors: Pablo Toral and Jessica Fox-Wilson


Ke (Duke) Ding '22
Hohhot, China
Major: Environmental Justice and Citizenship
Minor: Mathematics

What I Gained from Summer Internships in Renewable Energy and Environmental Education

 Two internships kept me busy this summer. I worked at a non-profit that advocates for renewable energy use and sustainability in the state of Wisconsin called RENEW Wisconsin, serving as their Energy Intern. I also worked as Summer Camp Educator at Beloit’s Friends of Welty Environmental Center, which promotes environmental education in our community. The two positions were radically different and pushed me to stretch myself intellectually, as well as professionally, in different directions. However, I found myself completing both with great ease and satisfaction and realized the rich and diverse skill set that I have developed as an environmental studies major, particularly effective communication skills, time management, teamwork, and creative problem solving. My internships also helped me realize that my professional interests are environmental education and energy and allowed me to see what new skills I need to develop for a successful professional career in both fields. I adjusted my choice of graduate programs accordingly.

 Career Works played a vital role as I put together my applications, offering advice on resume and cover letter editing, mock interviews, and Common Grant applications. My presentation will conclude by explaining to current students how they should take advantage of the office.

Room 349, Science Center, 2:00-2:50
Sponsor: Nicolette Meister


Beren Engstrom '25
Beloit, Wisconsin
Major: undeclared
Minor: undeclared

Emeline Russell '25
Aberdeen, Washington
Major: undeclared
Minor: undeclared

Natalia Ramirez-Vang '24
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Major: undeclared
Minor: undeclared

Lucian Krueger '24
Seattle, Washington
Majors: anthropology; history
Minor: museum studies

Aqua Crystal '23
Chicago, Illinois
Major: anthropology
Minor: museum studies

Informational Interviews with Beloit Museum Studies Alumni

 This semester, Museum Studies students had the opportunity to speak with Beloit College alumni who were working in museums or museums-related fields. Students were individually tasked with selecting an interviewee, taking the initiative in contacting them, hosting an informational interview, and then preparing brief class presentations describing their experience.

 Five students have agreed to share their experiences interviewing alumni, each sharing useful information or insight that they gained through this experience and highlighting the value of informational interviews to Beloit and beyond.

Room 349, Science Center, 1:25-1:50
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson


Umang Garg '22
New Delhi, India
Major: Quantitative Economics
Minor: Mathematics, Chinese Language

Making the most of your work-study at Beloit College!

 Beloit College Career Accelerator offered students opportunities to attend remote site visits, network with panelists, and receive resume advice from a host of talented alumni and business professionals. I conducted a research project on the event’s attendance data as part of my work-study at the college’s institutional research department. This research helped make informed decisions on future such events. This presentation explores the project’s key learning outcomes, including effective communication, project management, problem-solving, public speaking, and many others. It also aims to spark a conversation around making the most out of your on-campus employment at Beloit College.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 10:25-10:50
Sponsor: Beth Dougherty


Abhey Guram '24
Punjab, India
Major: International Relations

Delhi Under Siege: The Indian Farmers Protest

 In November 2020, hundreds of thousands of farmers decided to march to Delhi, the power center of Indian politics, to protest against three farm laws that had been rushed through the parliament and implemented in September 2020. The large majority of the farmers are small-scale and dominate the Indian agricultural sector. They do not have the infrastructure and resources to navigate the legal consequences of these new laws. Angered by the negative portrayal of the protest movement by the media and the government, the farmers set up the Trolley Times to provide news and commentary about the farmers’ movement and used social media to their benefit. This presentation examines the three farm laws and their consequences and discusses the innovative ways in which the farmers have sustained their protest movement and kept morale high even after 11 months of protesting and unsuccessful talks with the government.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 1:25-1:50
Sponsor: Leslie Williams


Chloe Hain '22
Evanston, Illinois
Majors: Anthropology; Biology

Archaeological Field School and the Unique Value of Firsthand Experience

 During this past summer, I participated in an archaeological field school through the University of Wyoming. Over the course of the field school I learned proper excavation, survey, lab, and even flint-knapping techniques from some of the most experienced archaeologists in the country. I had the chance to work on four separate sites and the opportunity to visit more, including the famous Hell Gap site in eastern Wyoming.

 The first two sites that we worked on were located in Laramie, WY, on land owned by the university. We excavated the inside and the outside of a well-preserved, early 20th century dug-out home structure on the northernmost side of the property and gathered information about how it was used. Across the university’s property, prehistoric artifacts such as projectile points and stone tools could be found simply resting on the surface, carried out of the dirt by a seemingly infinite number of ground squirrels. We conducted a survey across the site and opened up 3 test excavation units in areas with a high concentration of surface artifacts.

 The next site we worked on was once known as Carbon City, a mining town founded in 1868 along the transcontinental railroad. What was once a bustling city is now reduced almost entirely to foundations and is completely overrun with brush. While at the site, we made a comprehensive map of the major identifiable structures utilizing GPS tools and broad surveys.

 The final location we worked on is known as the La Prele Mammoth kill site. This is one of the oldest archaeological sites in Wyoming, dating back nearly 13,000 years. Over the course of our work, we were able to uncover information that drastically changed what archaeologists previously believed about the site and who lived there. We worked alongside graduate and PhD students excavating the site and in the lab cleaning and identifying artifacts.

Room 150, Science Center, 9:25-9:50
Sponsor: Philip Chen


Sam Hall '23
Eagle River, Alaska
Major: Political Science, Geology
Minor: Physics

United States Congress: Internships and Opportunities

 Over the past two summers I worked as an intern in the office of Alaska Congressman Don Young. I hope to share the story of my internship at the Beloit and Beyond Conference in order to encourage students with an interest in government to apply to programs like the one in which I participated. When I began my application process I assumed that a job like this would be prohibitively exclusive, almost unattainable. This is simply not the case, a point which I hope to make clear in my presentation. Between the offices in Anchorage and Washington, DC, I gained firsthand knowledge about the legislative process. I assisted the Congressman and his staff with policy, constituent services, social media and communications, as well as a large assortment of other tasks. I was also free to explore the Capitol Building Complex, where I rubbed shoulders with members of congress and their staff. My experience was fascinating, valuable, and surprisingly down to earth. I plan to continue my legislative experience by organizing a trip for Beloit College students to visit the Wisconsin State Capitol this spring (via the Political Science Department). Participants will have a chance to tour the capitol building and speak with state representatives regarding issues affecting Beloit College and its students. In addition to creating excitement for the congressional internship program, my Beloit and Beyond presentation will encourage students to participate in the state capitol field trip.

Room 249, Science Center, 9:00-9:25
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson
Casey Schimek (Milwaukee VA Medical Center)

Maura Hanley '22
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Major: Environmental Justice and Citizenship
Minors: Religious Studies; History

Green Summer at the Milwaukee VA Medical Center

 According to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the US is the world’s highest emitter of health care greenhouse gases, making up 27% of the global healthcare greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint. Food accounts for about 10-15% of healthcare greenhouse gas emissions. Even though this sector is not the largest contributor, sustainable changes to patient food services are feasible. The Milwaukee VA Medical Center, specifically its Green Environmental Management Systems (GEMS) department, has been working to lower the facility’s carbon footprint. Between 2018 and 2019, GEMS and the Nutrition and Food Services (NFS) department reduced meat consumption by 26%, leading to GHG emissions being reduced by 33% for patient food services.

 Through my summer internship with GEMS, I had the opportunity to research sustainable food practices and I worked closely with NFS to initiate the implementation of a few of these practices. Specifically, I suggested NFS incorporates meat blending into their homemade recipes due to its significant impacts in reducing GHG emissions. If meat blending is incorporated into NFS’s homemade meatloaf recipe, it can reduce the annual GHG emissions of this recipe by up to 35.48% and its annual cost by $1,175. This outcome may seem small, but it is a step towards more sustainable healthcare practices, and this project has the potential to influence future environmental projects at the Milwaukee VA.

 Overall, working on sustainability initiatives within a federal institution showed me how difficult it can be to implement wide scale, environmentally friendly projects. A lot of times, the question of whether or not this project will lead to cost savings in the short-term drives the decision-making process. Helping people see the long-term benefits of sustainable alternatives, regarding both financial savings and creating a healthier environment, is important for furthering future sustainability projects.

Room 150, Science Center, 1:25-1:50
Sponsor: Christopher Fink


Adrian Hughes '21
Herndon, Virginia
Majors: Creative Writing; Philosophy

Writing Wilderness: Poets on Boats

 What is “wilderness"? Where is it? Why do we assume it’ll always be out there? To find out, five Beloiters trekked to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) Wilderness in northern Minnesota for a summer class taught by creative writing professor Chris Fink. The BWCA is the largest wilderness area in the Midwest, and the only wilderness in the country that is solely navigable by boat. We stayed at the Coe College Wilderness Field Station, a cozy outpost near Ely, MN, overlooking glassy lakes and pine islets.

 Every day, we paddled out on canoes for workshop classes on top of cliffs. Twice, we ventured farther into the wilderness on longer camping expeditions. Unlike our prior Zoom semesters, for a whole month we had no wifi and no cellphone reception. Did we survive? Did we face physical and emotional challenges? Did we learn a lot? Yes, we sure did!

 My presentation will share our trips, the natural and historical sites we visited, the themes we wrote about, and the topics we learned. These topics include the definition of wilderness, humans’ place in nature, and the conception of nature as cleansing or rejuvenating. As the Boundary Waters protected area is still contested, it is also an example of the ongoing battleground for wilderness preservation.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 2:25-2:50
Sponsor: Joshua Moore


Ariane Irafasha '23
Kigali, Rwanda
Majors: Quantitative Economics; Health and Society
Minor: French

Internship at SCAN Health Plan

 Caring for the elderly is very important because everyone deserves good health. This summer, I had a remote internship with SCAN Health Plan, a medicare advantage plan based in Long Beach, California. I worked closely with the strategy team as an undergraduate strategy intern. The biggest part of this internship experience was a research project. I will share what the project was about, how I conducted it as well as the major lessons I learned from it. Moreover, being an international student, I will also share what I think my country can do to improve the health of seniors.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 9:25-9:50
Sponsor: Rachel Ellett


Jemia Irving '22
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Political Science
Minor: Spanish

Black Lives Matter: How Social Media Advances the Message

 This presentation will discuss how social media became a prominent tool during the beginning stages of the Black Lives Matter Movement in 2013-2014, and its affect on the movement several years later. The founders, Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi, introduced the Black Lives Matter movement through a single tweet with the #Blacklivesmatter. Later the hashtag appeared on thousands of screens following protests against police brutality after the deaths of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown. This decentralized organization has scholars debating its value and frame, because of its introduction to the world through social media (i.e., Twitter). Twitter became the movement’s working ground for supporters and gaining recognition, but it also simultaneously became a stomping ground for opponents and raised questions about long-term sustainability.

Room 249, Science Center, 1:25-1:50
Sponsors: Tawnya Cary and Helen Werner


Ian Jacobs '22
De Pere, Wisconsin
Major: Biochemistry
Minor: Religious Studies

Osteological Lesions and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Archaeological Remains in Relation to their Burial Conditions

 One of the ways that Tuberculosis affects the human body if left untreated is through the creation of skeletal lesions on the thoracic spine and ribs. Through the use of a Bayesian meta-analysis performed on bioarchaeological remains sourced from 28 previously published journal articles, this study examines the statistical relationship between the presence of these osteological lesions and the detection of the repetitive element marker IS6110 that is left behind in human tissue by Mycobacterial infections. Collection of this data was done using a set of rigorously constructed criteria that provided consistent and workable data for use in this analysis.

 A secondary research question addressed in this study involved the potential for Tuberculosis DNA degradation by means of diagenesis, or soil degradation, upon the skeletal remains of individuals laid to rest in soil for long periods of time. To analyze this assertion, descriptive statistical methods were utilized to view the trends in IS6110 detection among the many different burial techniques that were reported within the collected studies, and between the two overall categories of burial and non-burial methods. A significant chi square analysis was generated showing a relationship between burial and non-burial interment techniques and the detection of IS6110.

Room 150, Science Center, 1:00-1:25
Sponsor: Pablo Toral


Noah Joerin '23
Elgin, Illinois
Major: International Relations

The Mining-Conservation Divide in Ely, MN

 In summer of 2021, I took an Environmental Justice course at Coe College’s Wilderness Field Station in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness of Minnesota. My research project studied the roots of the divide over mining in Ely, Minnesota. Ely was largely a mining town until its last mine closed down in the 1960s. Tourism has been the backbone of the local economy since, as Ely has remained one of the main entry points for tourists going into the Boundary Waters. As new mines are currently under undergoing the process of environmental review required for approval in the Ely area, I found a divide in the Ely community resulting from the construction of different narratives. A pro-mining narrative believes that the town of Ely is suffering economically and needs mining to reinvigorate it. An anti-mining narrative proposes that Ely has only survived economically thanks to tourism generated by their proximity to the Boundary Waters, and that the pollution caused by the mines threatens the town’s economic viability, as it would keep tourists away.

 Conducting field research also taught me a lot about myself. The Wilderness Field Station made me rediscover my love of the outdoors and afforded me an opportunity to reset myself academically and emotionally after a stressful previous year. By canoeing and camping on our way to our research sites, I was able to grow my leadership skills and my ability to work in a team for long periods of time. All of the students grew, and we managed to accomplish the goals we set for ourselves. Students who enjoy the outdoors will have a lot to gain from attending a summer Wilderness Field Station course.

Room 249, Science Center, 12:35-1:00
Sponsor: Ben Stucky


Brandon Joly '23
Seymour, Wisconsin
Majors: Spanish Language and Culture; Mathematics; Education and Youth Studies

Cold Weather Teams in the National Football League and Home-Field Advantage

 The National Football League (NFL) has long had this idea of home-field advantage when teams play at home where they win more of their games. However, home games entail many things, such as home fan attendance and weather. In considering the mean winning percentage of home games played during the winter months of December, January, and February by cold weather teams, and the mean winning percentage of all home games played and all December, January, and February home games played, the null hypothesis would be that there is no difference in the means. By rejecting the null hypothesis, it would lead to the conclusion that cold weather plays a factor in determining NFL games. This hypothesis testing is important because if teams in “colder weather climates” gain a significant advantage during the colder months of December, January, and February, the impacts of playing in an open grass stadium during these months will have a greater impact on the playoffs and draft, which is decided based on final NFL standings. The finding is that cold weather teams have a significant advantage when compared to the other data found, which suggests that cold weather tends to impact NFL games more than expected.

Room 249, Science Center, 1:00-1:25
Sponsor: Eyad Said


Auras Bhadra Khanal '23
Kathmandu, Nepal
Major: Computer Science, Data Science

Classifying spam YouTube comments using Natural Language Processing

 The exponential increase in data flowing through the world wide web and the internet has engendered several new concerns among the technological community, especially large technological firms. Although the growth in data is complemented by growth in users, correspondingly, it has attracted more malicious users who attempt to jeopardize others’ private information by spreading malware and viruses and promoting videos/channels/schemas through social media platforms like YouTube, hindering their proper functionality. Although YouTube does have features that allow creators to filter spam comments that contain URLs, the variation of spam makes it complicated to create an automatic feature for their classification. In this project, data from the machine learning repository at University of California Irvine were used. The data contain a list of comments and their details for numerous popular music videos on YouTube. Several approaches based on machine learning and data mining techniques were implemented on this data to develop supervised-learning models to classify the comments into spam or ham. The results were then analyzed using statistical measures such as precision and recall from which it was concluded that the Random Forest Classifier model had the highest average accuracy of 95.5%.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 2:00-2:25
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson


Elinore Kosak '23
Brunswick, Maine
Majors: History; French Language & Culture

Layna Thompson '21
St. Paul, Minnesota
Major: Environmental Studies
Minors: Spanish; Political Science

The Value of Corporate and Nonprofit Internships

 This summer, I had an internship with the Boys & Girls Club of Janesville. This experience taught me so much about both working in a professional environment and also the city of Janesville. Through connections I made with the children I mentored, I understood the environment they live in and how that can shape a person. The more time I spent with the kids, the more I could understand how to best help them. This experience also helped me professionally. I discovered what I valued in a job and how I best function in a professional role. This presentation would be interesting to those looking to learn more about summer internships and Rock County.

Greenhouse, Science Center, Drop in
1:00-2:30
Sponsor: Deb Lynch


Kristin Larson '25
Beloit, Wisconsin
Majors: Studio Art; Education

Campus Greenhouse Open House

 The Beloit College greenhouse offers student workers hands-on learning through caretaking of over seventy individual plants belonging to thirty-five families.The Staghorn Fern was added to the plant collection in 1964. Other plants, including the Oakleaf fig, Night-blooming cereus,and Euphorbia splendens, are more than thirty years old. Plants are divided between 1600 square feet of growing zones that include tropical with a working pond, succulent/cacti, temperate, a small lab, and head house. The Greenhouse Tour includes the greenhouse itself, the chance to ask questions, and hands-on activities with seeds, plants, and potting.

 During the past semester, I’ve had the opportunity to work as a Greenhouse Assistant. My duties mainly focus on cleaning, weeding, and pruning plants. There is satisfaction in being a part of guiding the plants back to health if they are not well. I came to the greenhouse with some plant care knowledge, but continue to learn new things every day. I’ve learned how to treat different types of pest infestation and diseases on the plants in an organic way. I’ve also been able to slowly learn the scientific names of the plants. I look forward to learning more about the propagation, reproduction, and growth of plants in this upcoming semester as we prepare for a plant sale.

 The greenhouse offers students more than a place to learn; it also provides a calming atmosphere on a busy campus. The overall feeling of the space is inviting, peaceful and offers students a place to practice mindfulness. Perhaps one of my favorite parts of the greenhouse is to practice mindfulness by using my body and physical space to stay present, expand learning, and get creative. I find after my work hours are finished, I am refreshed, fulfilled, and my creative energy flows into my classwork for the rest of the day.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 2:00-2:50
Sponsor: Haley Lott


Haley Lott
Beloit, Wisconsin
Librarian

Beloiter to Fulbrighter

 Have you ever wondered what it would be like to play fútboll in Panama, make a traditional dinner in Sweden, or lead a puppet show in Malaysia? Learn how you can make a difference in the global community while serving as a cultural ambassador to the United States with the Fulbright Program.

 In this panel discussion, we will hear from Beloit Fulbright recipients about their international experience, the application process, and the perks and benefits of the program. For more information about Fulbright, visit https://us.fulbrightonline.org/ or contact lotth@beloit.edu.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 9:00-9:25
Sponsor: Laura Parmentier


Nayomi Neelangal '22
Nasik, India
Major: Biochemistry

Cardinals of Success from Summer

 Summer 2021 played a pivotal role in my life. I worked as a Research Intern on developing a protocol for weaning patients with acute failure off the heart assisting devices, using myocardial work and global strain. I had the opportunity and the privilege to work with an amazing team of doctors, nurses and researchers who shared immense passion for scientific research for the betterment of people. I was inspired. Presenting at the Beloit and Beyond Conference provides an opportunity for me to reflect deeply on the power of networking and the importance of doing what I love. It is through insightful reflection that we recognize the lessons learnt. The experiences that I have gathered at Beloit College in these past 3 years have enabled me to value my skill set and make the best out of them. Two key lessons I learnt during my internship were, 1. It is okay to fail and that failure is inevitable; and 2. It is going to take a large amount of hard work and perseverance if you want to succeed. Through this internship I have been able to see how important it is to have good communication skills, a strong work ethic, and how these factors affect professional relationships. I also realized the importance of involving myself in what I love the most and how choosing the right job can be one of the best and most satisfying decisions one can make. It has been a good dose of reality at the right time, i.e., right in senior year soon before I graduate.

CELEB MakerLab, Downtown Beloit, Drop in
1:00-3:00
Sponsor: Daniel Youd


Phuc (Jerry) Ngo '23
Can Tho, Vietnam
Major: Computer Science, Maths

Sparked by Curiosity, Fueled by Creativity: The Maker Lab

 Working on a personal project is a hands-on experience that helps students to apply in-class knowledge to real life. MakerLab is an off-campus student-run studio aiming for assisting projects by providing material and machinery. The studio is furnished with equipment and tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, sewing machines, etc. Our presentation will be hosted at MakerLab where supervisors will introduce students to major equipment of the lab. Students will learn the procedure, safety tips of machines and then apply them to print bags, make buttons, and print a 3D model. Students should feel free to drop by at any time during the session.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 9:25-9:50
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson


Phuc (Jerry) Ngo '23
Can Tho, Vietnam
Major: Computer Science, Maths

How to Apply and Make the Most out of an REU Program

 Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) is a summer program where students join an institution or a lab to conduct specialized research on science, engineering, or mathematics. It helps students to further their in-class knowledge and to better their understanding of the graduate school. The presentation covers my experience as an REU intern at MIT in the past summer and some tips on how to apply to a program. It also addresses common issues like communicating with the lab, networking with professors, or communicating your research.

Room 150, Science Center, 10:00-10:50
Sponsor: Kristin Labby


Lexy Olson '23
Beloit College, Wisconsin
Majors: Biochemistry; Psychology
Minor: N/A

Steven Soli '22
Cary, Illinois
Major: Biology
Minor: Chemistry

Silas Say '22
Spokane, Washington
Majors: Biology; Health & Society
Minor: Spanish

Roundtable: Student Experiences in Healthcare

 This session will feature current Beloit students sharing their experiences with internships, certifications, volunteering and many more opportunities that to gain knowledge in the field of healthcare. Lexy Olson (biochemistry ‘23) will describe her work volunteering within the Beloit Health System, shadowing many local doctors, surgeons, nurses, physician assistants to determine which career path will suit her best, and interning as an EMT in emergency department settings. Silas Say (biology ‘22) has shadowed and interned in physical therapy settings and will share his experiences. Steven Soli (biology ‘22) will primarily share his internship with OrthoIllinois in their medical research department and assisting with patient visits, and also his remote internship for King’s College Hospital, volunteering at Beloit Memorial Hospital, and his work as President of the Beloit College student Pre-Health Professionals Club.

Room 349, Science Center, 9:00-9:25
Sponsor: Jingjing Lou


Sumin Park '22
Seongnam, Republic of Korea
Major: Education & Youth Studies / Psychology

Lessons about Schooling during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Going Back or Moving Forward?

 Schooling, specifically in-person schooling, services multiple goals to support children’s development. It provides 1) emotion-related socialization settings (Eisenberg et al., 1998), 2) classroom environment for accelerated academic settings (Baek et al., 2002;Pintrich, 2003), and 3) various sources and support such as in ESL (Roney, 2008) and special education (Antia, 1999). The sudden closure of schools due to COVID-19 pandemic in spring 2020 resulted in various consequences that disrupted students’ development. Longer screen time due to change to online classes (Johnson, 2021) interferes with students’ physical and mental health, possibly resulting in long-term consequences and future disorders (Sultana et al., 2021), such as behavioral disorders and socialization issues (Mukhametzyanov, 2021). Lack of participation and engagement is another issue during class time, as online learning limits personal connections between students and teachers (Ali et al., 2020). Other concerns include students’ well being (Leeb et al., 2020), loss of physical activity (World Health Organization, 2020), and minority students who are being left behind due to their socioeconomic status (Garcia et al., 2020; Schartz et al., 2021; Oster et al., 2021).

 Schools worldwide have been struggling to provide a balanced education for students during virtual learning. In this study, I compared a few selected countries’ educational strategies and how they are used in response to COVID. I included literature review of case studies of Singapore, New Zealand, and Finland. I also closely examined YongJeong Middle school in South Korea as an additional case study through interviews with educators in the school. YongJeong is one of the few schools in Korea offering in-person education during COVID, balancing strict protocol to prevent the spread of COVID-19 with maintaining their school values and experience-based learning environment through in person learning. I conclude with implications for policy makers and educators about what worked and what didn’t, and how schools could take the lessons learned during the global pandemic, to the post-COVID world.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 1:00-1:25
Sponsor: Carol Wickersham
Carol Wickersham

Jasmine Paulson '21
Rockford, Illinois
Major: Sociology

Community Action PREP PhotoVoice Project

 When I asked 13-17 year olds in the Community Action PREP summer camp, “What does friendship mean to you?”, they were given a platform to share their own voices in response to the question through photos and quotes. This project allowed them to share sneak peeks into their lives and minds. This is a collection of images and words that are are individualized moments taken by 7 different high school students in the Beloit community representing how they define friendship.

Neese Gallery, Wright Museum, drop in 11:00-4:00
Sponsors: Carol Wickersham and Christa Story
Community Action, Inc., of Rock and Walworth Counties
Family Services of Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois

Jasmine Paulson '21
Rockford, Illinois
Major: Sociology

Voleak Phan 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Nathan Lemke 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Faces of Friendship; Faces of Resilience

Faces of Friendship; Faces of Resilience is modeled after PhotoVoice, a project that aims to empower individuals to tell their own stories through words and photographs. Here, some of our neighbors in Beloit speak about resilience and friendship in the time of COVID-19. We hope they prompt you to reflect on what has sustained you during the pandemic. This exhibit was organized and curated by Duffy interns Jasmine Paulson and Voleak Phan, Curatorial intern Nathan Lemke, and Advisors Carol Wickersham and Christa Story, in collaboration with Community Action, Inc., of Rock and Walworth Counties and Family Services of Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 8:35-9:00
Sponsor: Amy Briggs


Sonali Pendharkar '22
Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Majors: Psychology; Biology
Minor: Health and Society

My Journey of Applying to Physical Therapy Schools

 Change is the only constant thing in life! During the summer before my senior year, I decided that I wanted to change my career completely from Clinical Psychology to Physical Therapy (PT). This meant taking a lot of difficult classes during modules to fulfill graduate school requirements. I also had to arrange observation hours and think about physical therapy programs. There was a lot to be learned and many important decisions needed to be made in a short amount of time. In this presentation, I will take you on a journey through my experiences from deciding to be a physical therapist to actually applying to PT school this semester.

Room 150, Science Center, 9:00-9:25
Sponsor: H. Bierman


Jalen Ponder '25
South Beloit, Illinois
Major: Economics
Minor: Business

The Hard Work of Being Lazy

 The experience of running four businesses since the age of 13, while currently operating two of them has provided rich learning opportunities that contribute in fundamental ways to how we can live meaningful lives.

 For example, short-term decisions, that appear positive and smart in the moment, can have very real and negative side effects over time. Emphasis will be given to the importance of taking agency over decisions you make. Habits and attitudes developed day after day have an outsized influence over the quality of your work and your life.

 Much of this discussion will draw on personal experiences running my businesses.

Room 349, Science Center, 8:35-9:00
Sponsor: Kristin Bonnie


Swaroop Poudel '22
Kathmandu, Nepal
Majors: Psychology; Business Economics
Minor: Computer Science

Using Zoom as a Tool for Research in Social and Developmental Psychology

 As a result of the pandemic, the world has been more open to digital meetings, conferences, and research. Last year, I was able to take advantage of the opportunity to participate in online research at Cornell University and the University of Michigan. I will talk about the research I did on differences in wealth perception of children, as well as on the prosocial behavior of children. I will go in-depth about how I recruited participants, designed stimulus, and conducted studies over Zoom. I will also discuss how to obtain similar opportunities for yourself or conduct your research at Beloit.

Room 249, Science Center, 2:00-2:50
Sponsor: Tamara Ketabgian


Martina Pulido '22
San Diego, California
Major: Environmental Geology

Amy Ward '22
Golden Valley, Minnesota
Majors: Environmental Studies: Justice & Citizenship; French

Anett Martinez Vazquez '25
Shakopee, Minnesota
Majors: Engineering; Computer Science

Syd Clark '22
Ventura, California
Majors: Environmental Studies: Justice and Citizenship; Internationa

Abhey Guram '24
Punjab, India
Major: International Relations

Beloit Students for a Sustainable Campus

 In this roundtable, participants will discuss their leadership and project management as Student Assistants for the Sustainability Career Channel. Topics include their work on campus initiatives involving food, waste, and energy. What have they learned about the skills and practices needed to manage projects, work as a team, and promote inclusive, sustainable, and environmentally friendly change? What is their advice for other students interested in pursuing similar work?

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 12:35-1:00
Sponsor: Chris Wagoner


Aphelion Rishel '23
Madison, Wisconsin
Major: Spanish
Minor: Chinese

Turtle Tunes: Musical Outreach in Beloit

 Turtle Tunes is a special project program at Beloit College wherein students from the college go to Todd Elementary School here in Beloit twice a week to teach the students there, usually teaching stringed instruments or piano. The program is majority student-run and coordinated, with support from staff at Todd and the orchestra directors here at Beloit, Chris and Mary Wagoner. I want to discuss my experiences with the program and how it has enhanced my experiences as a student here at Beloit College, as I’ve participated in the program since fall semester of freshman year and plan to continue participating for my remaining semesters here.

Room 349, Science Center, 9:25-9:50
Sponsors: Angi Olesen and Kristin Frey


Emilia Roman '23
Chicago, Illinois
Majors: Psychology; Music

Music and Language Development in the Modern Classroom: Teachers’ Perspectives during a Pandemic

 Both music and language are human forms of communication that play a large role in educational development and self-expression (Harvey 2018). This relationship between music and language has led to the exploration of the benefits of formal and informal music lessons for children. My research posed these questions in consideration of the current pandemic and its implications for future instruction. To gain a deeper insight on the educator’s view of music as a pedagogical tool, I have conducted semi-structured individual interviews with a diverse group of educators who are known to integrate music into their curriculum. Teachers’ incorporation of music ranged from drum circles to transitional cues, and course subjects impacted the role music played in their class. The switch to online classes led to challenges with student communication and technology accessibility.

Career Works, Pearsons Hall, Drop in
11:00-4:00
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson


Antariksh Sharma '23
Mumbai, India
Majors: Computer Science; Political Science

Linked-Out: Career Works Escape Room

 “Getting a Job” is important for most college students. The topic itself raises uncertainty, as many students do not know how they would get a job after college. Recognizing the problem at hand, I designed a fun simulation to demonstrate the services offered by Career Works.

 The goal of the escape room event is to ease this tension by preparing students and helping them navigate through their career paths. An escape room is a perfect way to mimic the job search experience because there are essential clues that you need to know when applying for a job. Only when you find those essential clues will you get out of the same room, just like using these tips will help you successfully navigate the job search. This event also has the goal of creating connections between the student body and the faculty and staff on campus.

 We have two special guests, Matt Laszlo ’92 and Tim Leslie ’89, who will provide us with their professional insights into the job market. Matt Lazlo was most recently a C-Suite Executive for The Clorox Company, a Fortune 500 company that during his 4-year tenure experienced significant growth. His 25+ years of business experience ranges from multi-billion dollar global consumer companies (Clorox) to small commercial organizations. Mr. Laszlo’s executive coaching business helps aspiring and existing executives develop their most inspiring, effective, and authentic leadership style. After graduation, Tim received his law degree from Yale. Tim brings 20 years of experience as an executive at Amazon. In 2013, Tim transitioned to a business role, launching and operating Prime Video in 200+ countries and territories globally. In 2019, Tim left Amazon to become the CEO of Leafly, the world’s largest cannabis media and information company. Tim now serves as a management consultant and board member of nonprofit and for-profit companies who share his passion for nurturing our local communities and the environment that sustains them.

 Throughout the activity, students will work on collecting clues and hints from resumes, cover letters, and more. These tasks will prepare them for the final encounter with “the Boss” or the hiring manager who would check if the job applicants have met the requirement to be hired, thus confronting the career dilemma.

Room 349, Science Center, 12:35-1:00
Sponsor: Athena Tate


Abhishek Shekhar '24
Kathmandu, Nepal
Major: Computer Science, Mathematics

Learning Beyond the Classroom at LITS

 As a computer science student, we spend a lot of time learning theoretical concepts, such as programming languages, algorithms. However, the only exposure to make any practical use of our skills is in the form of assignments and group projects. Working with LITS over the summer has helped me hone my skills and provided a platform for me to showcase my knowledge. A couple of examples of the projects we worked on were: writing a script to update macOS for members of the faculty and staff, setting up computer labs, and documentations.

 While in class, we learned the chronological process of software development, which involves planning, design, analysis, troubleshooting, deployment, and maintenance; but my time at LITS helped me implement these skills, and provided hands-on experience when we designed the script and worked through ways to implement it. We also did research on macOS Big Sur, and devised ways to deploy and test it. On one hand, our tests were successful; nonetheless, when deploying the OS upgrade to everyone, the process was much more challenging.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 12:35-1:10
Sponsor: Ellen Joyce


Gabrie Simmons '22
Kenosha, Wisconsin
Major: Biology
Minor: Spanish

Natalie Dekker '23
Prior Lake, Minnesota
Majors: Psychology; Media Studies

Ericka Corral '22
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Computer Science

Olivia Taylor '22
San Diego, California
Majors: Theatre Production; International Relations
Minors: African Studies; French

Jo Simms '24
Lawrence, Kansas
Majors: Biology; Critical Identity Studies

AST and Beyond: A Leadership Experience Panel from the Alpha Sigma Tau Sorority

 As members of the executive board of the Alpha Sigma Tau Sorority, this panel will discuss leadership experiences that have prepared them intellectually and professionally for life outside of the sorority and the college.

Room 249, Science Center, 9:25-9:50
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson


Steven Soli '22
Cary, Illinois
Major: Biology
Minor: Chemistry

Being Pre-Med Through a Computer

 For all pre-med students, the summer following sophomore year is a critical moment, and being interrupted by a pandemic was a major loss for many students. As the co-president and financial chair of the Pre-Health Professionals Club, I worked closely with other executive board members to use virtual experiences to our advantage. I helped coordinate alumni events and virtual conferences during the 2020-21 academic year. These events and networking with the City of Beloit also started connections the club can grow in the future years.

 One critical reason I chose Beloit College was the motivation to study abroad, which I planned for the fall of my junior year. These plans were upended by the pandemic, and I no longer had any international experience. I scrambled to find a plan, and luckily Dr. Brewer in the Office of International Education pushed me to apply for a remote internship, a program that I was ultimately accepted into.

 My remote internship was facilitated by CAPA International, which placed me with the Clinical Biochemistry and Pathology team at King’s College Hospital in London, England. I overcame my initial nervousness by actively communicating with instructors, site, and regional advisors. Communication involved email discussions and periodic Zoom meetings. As an intern, I found that one must go by the supervisor’s schedule, which entailed meetings at 4 and 6 AM, requiring diligence and maintenance of a strict schedule. I learned about cultural intelligence and also developed my professional portfolio through mock interviews and classes. The biggest takeaway from this internship was learning how to tell my experiences and what I’ve gained as an interesting story.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 1:10-1:45
Sponsor: Joshua Moore


Channtha Sum '24
Cambodia
Major: Political Science
Minor: Chinese

Chamnan Suon '22
Cambodia
Major: Quantitative economics

Sochea Chhay '25
Cambodia
Major: International and Economics
Minor: French

Ariane Irafasha '23
Kigali, Rwanda
Majors: Quantitative Economics; Health & Society
Minor: French

SHE-CAN Weissberg Scholars at Beloit College

 With support from the SHE-CAN and Weissberg organizations, four SHE-CAN-Weissberg scholars received opportunities to pursue higher education at Beloit College. Their educational journeys at Beloit College have created extraordinary changes in their personal and professional growth as a student as well as a future contributor to their societies. Each scholar is recruited from countries where women’s access to education is still one of the big issues in their societies. Their stories and experiences about their education at Beloit College in the United States as well as about their internship experiences will be shared in this presentation.

Weeks Lounge, Pearsons Hall, 10:00-10:50
Sponsor: Carol Wickersham


Chamnan Suon '22
Cambodia
Major: Quantitative economics

Thu Dinh Tran 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Eleanor Arms 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Jasmine Paulson 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Sahil Rizal 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Mezekerta Tesfay 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Nichole Espineli 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Audrey Peasley 'XX
Unknown
Major: undeclared

Learning from the Community through the Duffy Community Partnerships

 Join current and former Duffy students to hear about their experiences learning from a wide diversity of people in our community, from second graders to CEOs in a variety of sectors--business, government, education, social service, health care, criminal justice, and more. This will be free-wheeling discuss in a fishbowl format moderated by Duffy Director, Carol Wickersham.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 8:35-9:00
Sponsor: Charles Westerberg


Mezekerta Tesfay '23
Grinnell, Iowa
Major: Sociology
Minor: Political Science

Social Media, Reproductive Rights, and the Future of Activism

 Social media is now an extremely central and necessary part of our society, and it is no longer just used for personal social gratification. Today, businesses use social media to attract and retain customers. Non-profit organizations need social media in order to recruit financial support and volunteers. Schools use social media to market themselves to future students. And on and on. This past summer I interned at a non-profit called Jane’s Due Process, which works to help teens and young people gain access to abortions and other reproductive healthcare services in one of the hardest states to access them, Texas. In this presentation, I will explain what I did this past summer, what I learned, and why I think social media will play an increasingly crucial role in our society. I will also discuss how my internship at Jane’s Due Process informed my future plans and what kind of job opportunities are available to others interested in this field!

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 2:00-2:25
Sponsor: Pablo Toral


Layna Thompson '21
St. Paul, Minnesota
Major: Environmental Studies
Minors: Spanish; Political Science

Elinore Kosak '23
Brunswick, Maine
Majors: History; French Language and Culture

The Value of Corporate and Nonprofit Internships

 I worked for Best Buy’s Environmental Sustainability and Compliance team as an Associate Intern last summer. My main project was to research and present on our vendors’ sustainability policies and progress to my team. This internship allowed me to sharpen a wide range of skills such as copyediting, data analysis, and Excel proficiency that I developed through my previous academic experiences during the Rivers in Transition program in China and classes such as Environmental Politics. After graduating this December, I hope to get a job in sustainability communications, where I can build on these skills even further. My conference presentation will elaborate on my summer job and explain why internships are a valuable part of building career experience. Students interested in domains as full of possibilities as Environmental Studies, sustainability, and the communications or writing-based area of environmental sciences will benefit from learning about this opportunity.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall, 10:00-10:25
Sponsors: Joshua Moore and Rachel Ellett


Kyle Thompson-Taylor '22
Cincinnati, Ohio
Major: Political Science
Minor: Music

Injustices and Inaccessibility in the Court System: Reflections from a Legal Self-Help Center

 During the summer of 2021, I served as an AmeriCorps member in the Illinois JusticeCorps program. I served in the Legal Self-Help Center at the 17th Circuit Court of Illinois in Rockford. During my time with JusticeCorps, I primarily worked one-on-one with court patrons who could not afford to hire an attorney for civil cases. Assisting these patrons on a daily basis showed me the many ways in which the legal system is fundamentally inaccessible. This inaccessibility ranges from the physical accessibility of buildings and spaces, to the general in-group/out-group mentality that exists within the system. The court system is most accessible to straight, cis, white, able-bodied individuals who were born in the United States and are in a higher socio-economic status. However, during my time with JusticeCorps, the majority of the patrons that I worked with did not possess all of these identities, highlighting the injustices within the so-called justice system. During my presentation, I will explore the inaccessibility I witnessed in the legal system, as well as how this inaccessibility directly impacts the lives of individuals within the Rockford community.

Room 249, Science Center, 10:00-10:50
Sponsor: Tamara Ketabgian


Jacob Toepfer '22
Lake Mills, Wisconsin
Majors: Creative Writing; Media Studies
Minor: Journalism

Jeremy Duval '23
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Majors: Creative Writing; Sociology

Qiongyi (Jasmine) Feng '23
Chongqing, China
Major: Literary Studies

From English to an Internship in Sports, Human Rights, or Social Justice

 Hear from three English majors about their experiences as interns in a variety of fields, ranging from sports (the Snappers), to human rights (an international NGO), to social justice (Planned Parenthood). What were their experiences like? What did they learn? What advice would they give to others interested in similar areas and positions?

Room 349, Science Center, 1:00-1:25
Sponsor: Jessica Fox-Wilson


Tianlong Wang '23
Beloit, Wisconsin
Major: Computer Science
Minor: Math

Teaching Kids Programming at iD Tech

 During the summer of 2021, I virtually taught coding to kids aged 10-18, through a program at iD tech. In this presentation, I will discuss how I found my virtual internship, my work experience at iD Tech this summer, how online summer camps are conducted, and the interesting projects that my students and I made during this internship. After this presentation, we will hear about an objective and detailed view about summer camp, and a subjective and reflective view about what are some possible benefits that working as an instructor can bring to everyone.

 I found my internship through Handshake. In order to do so, I had to follow several steps to successfully secure the internship. These included: completing my profiles on Handshake, responding to the staff at Career Works and seeking help with the resume, and modifying information after being notified.

 During this summer, I used a teaching model called “I do, you do, we do,” which is more effective when working with kids and teenagers. There is going to be an example that will be conducted during the presentation and compared with another example without any teaching models.

 Working as an instructor full-time during this summer made my choice about the career switching from exploring technology to working as an instructor who conducts technology. I will present the reasons why I made this decision, discuss with everyone what are some other influences about this kind of job, and talk about some examples that I’m looking forward to.

Room 150, Science Center, 12:35-1:00
Sponsor: Pablo Toral


Amy Ward '22
Golden Valley, Minnesota
Majors: Environmental Studies: Justice and Citizenship; French

Exploring My Wilderness: Personal, Academic, and Professional Things I Learned on Trail in the Boundary Water Canoe Wilderness Area

 Last summer I took a course called Environmental Justice at Coe College’s Wilderness Field Station in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. As I canoed my way through the area, I not only learned about and conducted applied field research, I also learned new things about myself personally, academically, and professionally. My individual research project, entitled “The Adventure Gap: Race and Diversity in the Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area and Quetico Provincial Park,” evolved out of my own personal experience as a female person of color when I realized that most of the people I saw throughout the wilderness were white, even though the Anishinaabe called the area home for centuries. Environmental justice offered me a theoretical framework to delve deeper into the reasons for the lack of ethnic diversity in wilderness areas. Field research also helped me sharpen important academic and professional skills, such as communications, leadership, and teamwork. I learned how to communicate effectively by conducting interviews with informants, as well as by working with classmates while canoeing and camping. I gained leadership skills by learning how to take initiative on tasks and delegate tasks to others. My presentation will look into my future by elaborating on how wilderness education and conducting applied field research will benefit my academic and professional career, as someone who wants to pursue a graduate degree and enter the professional field of environmental policy. Finally, I will explain how other Beloit students would benefit from the experiential learning opportunities at the Coe College Wilderness Field Station.


OUR SINCERE THANKS
Thank you to all those who advanced the work of our students through their time, educational expertise, and funding through a variety of opportunities designated for research support, including:
  • American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Grant Fund
  • Anthropology Student Enrichment Fund
  • Biology Student-Faculty Collaboration and Research Fund
  • Richard A. and Mary Ann Davis Endowed Travel and Research Fund for Geology
  • Duffy Community Partnerships Program
  • Jerry Gustafson Endowed Fund
  • Hartigan Endowed Fund
  • Health and Society Endowed Fund
  • International Education Venture Fund
  • Kemler Fund for Model UN Program
  • Kenneth S. Kemmerer Endowed Memorial Student Research Fund
  • Lockwood Research and Travel Grants Endowed Fund
  • The Mazur Family Endowed Fund for Faculty and Student Research
  • Les McAllister Student Research and Travel Endowed Fund
  • Mikva-Cohen Endowed Internship Fund
  • Mouat and Whiteford Endowed Research Fund
  • Professor Richard Newsome Endowed Fund
  • David Norris Endowed Memorial Student Research Fund
  • Pakula Biomedical Fellowship Program
  • Psychology Student Research Fund
  • Sanger Summer Research Fund
  • Eloise Marston Schnaitter Endowed Wildflower Garden Fund
  • Janice and Gary Small Endowed Student Research and Travel Fund
  • Philip A. Sprague Endowed Student-Faculty Research Fund
  • Stateline Community Foundation Grant for Women
  • Ivan Stone International Relations Internship Fund
  • Stutz Student Grant Fund
  • Jane Townsend Excellence Fund
  • Carl and Susan Welty Endowed Fund
  • The Weissberg Program in Human Rights and Social Justice
  • WiscAMP Advanced Opportunities Small Grants for Student Research
  • For generous support of designated student research funds, a special thanks to:
  • American Chemical Society
  • Frederick Arndt '93
  • Brandon '07 & Rachel Bartkowiak
  • Elizabeth Chenoweth '55
  • Cohen Family Foundation
  • Richard '59 & Mary Ann Davis
  • James E. Duffy '49*
  • Betty '38 & George Frost*
  • Jerry '63 & Nancy '64 Gustafson
  • John Hartigan '90
  • Elizabeth & Lynn Hiser
  • Douglas Kemmerer
  • Kenneth Kemmerer, Jr.
  • Lockwood Charitable Foundation
  • Peter & Sara Mazer*
  • Elaine McAllister*
  • Margaret McAllister & David Jackson
  • Mary Mikva '74 & Steven Cohen '75
  • Lucia Mouat
  • Malcolm M. & Nancy Mouat
  • Takashi '66 & Sayoko Nagata
  • Robert '66 & Kathleen Norris
  • Lawrence '53 & Sheila* Pakula
  • Judith E. Parker
  • Elizabeth Peavy '49*
  • C. Allen Reed '76
  • James & Marjorie Sanger
  • Janice '62 & Gary Small
  • Philip A. '46 & Esther Sprague*
  • Stateline Community Foundation
  • Martha '59 & Alan '59 Stutz
  • Estate of Jane Couffer Townsend '44
  • Marvin F. Weissberg*
  • Nina V. Weissberg '84
  • The Weissberg Foundation
  • Estate of Susan Welty*
  • Andrew '37 & Marion '37 Whiteford*
  • John H. '65 & Josephine Whiteford
  • Linda M. Whiteford '69 & Douglas Uzzell
  • Michael '67 & Patricia Whiteford
  • Scott W. Whiteford & Heather Woods
  • WiscAMP
  • *Deceased Donor


    Link to the online program

    See program from a previous Symposium
    See pdf abstracts for previous International Symposia