Beloit College International Symposium, November 15, 2017

The International Symposium celebrates Beloit College as an international college. In this sixteenth annual event, 66 student presenters and 42 faculty sponsors and moderators will directly participate as Beloit students share their international studies with the community.


Names of presenters in the schedule link to their abstract. The bars between abstracts link back here. Link to pdf.

Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall
 
Moderator: Kristin Bonnie, Department of Psychology
9:00
Kristin Bonnie
Opening remarks
9:05
Current Psychological Therapies and Mental Health Care in China
9:30
Flood Prevention and the Yellow River, China
9:55
Rivers in Transition: Connecting Geological History and Material Culture in Henan Province
10:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: James Rougvie, Department of Geology
10:30
James Rougvie
Opening remarks
10:35
Pictorial Representations of the Yellow River Landscapes in Qing Dynasty Historical Sources
11:00
Architectural Changes to Cultural Features in Kaifeng, China Related to Flooding Events
11:25
What’s the China Factor in the Political Development in Hong Kong?
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Bob Elder, Department of Economics & Management
1:00
Bob Elder
Opening remarks
1:05
Intersectionality in Hong Kong
1:30
Gender Asobi: Playing with Gender in a Genderless Language
1:55
My Internship Experience in Manila, the Philippines
2:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Jingjing Lou, Department of Education & Youth Studies
2:30
Jingjing Lou
Opening remarks
2:35
Planting Trees in Jordan
3:00
Inside Russian Tourism and the Factors That Affect It
3:25
The Emergence and Treatment of New Religious Organizations and Cults in Post-Soviet Russia
3:50
Break
 
 
Room 150, Science Center
 
Moderator: Joe Bookman, Theatre, Dance and Media Studies
9:00
Joe Bookman
Opening remarks
9:05
Code-switching among English-speaking Learners of German in Marburg’s International Undergraduate Study Program
9:30
Conflicts in Holocaust Atonement: The Transformation of the WWII Nazi Concentration Camps in Germany
9:55
Investigating the Role of Environmental Artists in Shaping the British Landscape: from Turner to Goldsworthy
10:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Philip Chen, Department of Political Science
10:30
Philip Chen
Opening remarks
10:35
No Aprobar: Insights into Making the Best of Academic Struggles in Murcia, Spain
11:00
Field Experience Grant Panel
11:25
Navigating Multiple Identities While Studying Abroad
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: George Lisensky, Department of Chemistry
1:00
George Lisensky
Opening remarks
1:05
International Experiences in Anthropology
1:30
Excavating a Medieval Cemetery in Hågerup, Denmark
1:55
Neolithic Scotland: The Stone Masters of the Orkney Archipelago
2:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Matthew Vadnais, Department of English
2:30
Matthew Vadnais
Opening remarks
2:35
Viel Lärm um Nichts: Shakespeare by the Lake in Upper Austria
3:00
Re-discovering the Meanings of Contemporary Dance in Denmark, Italy, and Malta
3:25
How to be Roman--The Nerd Edition
3:50
Break
 
 
Wood Room, Mayer Hall (second floor)
 
Moderator: Nicolette Meister, Department of Museum Studies
9:00
Nicolette Meister
Opening remarks
9:05
Current Research on Nerve Degeneration in Canines
9:30
Public Lands, Public Archaeology, Public Stake
9:55
Macrohistory and Microhistory: Comparing Archival Spaces
10:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Ibrahim Moustafa, Department of Chemistry
10:30
Ibrahim Moustafa
Opening remarks
10:35
Faunal Evidence of Dietary Preferences of Homo erectus from Makuyuni Region, Northern Tanzania
11:00
An Assessment of the Chlorocebus pygerythrus Population on Misali Island, Pemba: A Population Census and the Impact on Biodiversity and Human
11:25
Art and Identity in Durban, South Africa
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Sylvia López, Department of Modern Languages & Literatures
1:00
Sylvia López
Opening remarks
1:05
Safeguarding Against the Military in Argentina
1:30
On the Ground vs. in the Office: Experiences Working in a Mexican Migrant Camp and in an Embassy
1:55
You’re Worth Fighting For: Ometepe, Nicaragua says “Yes to Life”
2:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Ken Yasukawa, Department of Biology
2:30
Ken Yasukawa
Opening remarks
2:35
Conducting Summer Research as an International Student in United States
3:00
North America’s Northern Pacific Coastal Cedar Populations and Glaciers: A Case Study in a Global Context
3:25
The Importance of Traditional Diets: Dietary Change as an Instrument of Cultural Genocide of Ojibwe People in the United States and Canada
3:50
Break
 
 
Room 349, Science Center
 
Moderator: Daniel Barolsky, Department of Music
10:30
Daniel Barolsky
Opening remarks
10:35
SEL Students Study Abroad: How You Can Afford a Semester Abroad
11:00
Accessing Health Services Abroad Panel
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Rongal Watson, Department of Political Science and Health and Society
1:00
Rongal Watson
Opening remarks
1:05
Athletes Abroad: You can do it!
1:30
Student Panel on Studying Abroad in the Sciences
1:55
Where are the Men? A Conversation About Why So Few Study Off-Campus
2:45
Break
 
 

Abstracts


 SC349 1:55
Sponsor: Elizabeth Brewer

Lisa Anderson-Levy
Department of Anthropology

Paul Dionne
Office of Academic Diversity and Inclusiveness

Greg Buchanan
Department of Psychology

Robert Robinson '18
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Business Economics
Minor: Studio Art

Where are the Men? A Conversation About Why So Few Study Off-Campus

 Over the last two years, the number of students choosing to study off-campus has declined despite higher enrollment over the same period. While there are multiple complexities involved in why students choose not to study off-campus, research conducted by Beloit College indicates that particular demographics of students are more likely to resist these opportunities. Though the numbers of all students studying abroad have declined, the numbers of men, athletes, and athletes who are men, have declined even further. Current data indicates that 66 percent of students at Beloit College who studied away during 2016/17 academic year were women while 34 percent were men. Although this breakdown is similar to national data, how ought we interpret these data? What, if anything, does it mean? This panel will explore some of the barriers that prevent men and athletes who are men from studying away from campus and identify some strategies to address this issue. If we consider this to be an institutional concern that may be connected to broader social concerns about boys graduating high school at lower rates than girls or men not attending colleges at the same rate as women, what are productive avenues for thinking about this and what can we do about it? If, as an institution we continue to value students crossing borders, both national and cultural, in ways that positively transform their Beloit experiences, these numbers must be understood as a call to arms. The hope is that this is the beginning of wider campus conversations about how to support and encourage all students to participate in high impact learning activities, particularly those who do not imagine that these opportunities are “for” them or that off-campus study can be personally transformative and an asset for 21st century careers.


 SC150 10:35
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Alden Blatter '18
Seattle, Washington
Majors: International Relations; Spanish

No Aprobar: Insights into Making the Best of Academic Struggles in Murcia, Spain

 Over the course of my ten months studying Spanish literature and politics in Murcia, Spain, I frequently considered how I would explain my time abroad to my family, professors, and friends. I thought I would tell stories of my traveling adventures, the interesting people I met, and the cultural phenomena I experienced, but not ones of academic failure. It was only when preparing for my final exams that I realized that my Beloit College experience had not prepared me for the daunting Spanish grading process. Classes in Murcia were solely lecture based, unlike the predominantly discussion based liberal arts classes that I thrive in at Beloit, and had few if any assignments or tests before the final to keep students on track. I failed a number of classes abroad because of these differences, but still returned to the U.S. satisfied with my experience, and the lessons I had learned about adjusting to a distinct academic system. Asking professors sympathetic to international students for help, and working with Murcian students were adjustments I made in an attempt to navigate these institutional differences. Unfortunately, by the time I made these adjustments it was too late in the semester. This symposium will cover the academic struggles I faced while studying at a Spanish university, and the ways which I dealt with them and still felt like I achieved my goals abroad. Hopefully it will provide Beloit students planning to go abroad with some recommendations that can contribute to their academic success. These recommendations begin with picking the correct program that fits the level of Spanish the student has going in (direct enrollment versus exchange). Choosing the right classes, communicating with professors early in the semester, and working with local students are also crucial to succeeding at a Spanish university.


 SC150 1:55
Sponsor: Shannon Fie

Blaine Burgess '20
Danville, Illinois
Major: Anthropology

Neolithic Scotland: The Stone Masters of the Orkney Archipelago

 Across the Orkney Islands off the northeastern shore of Scotland, stones standing upwards of nineteen feet define both the modern and prehistoric landscape. The center of Neolithic Orkney is considered by many to be the Ness of Brodgar. This six-acre site includes a multitude of stone structures and a 20 foot thick perimeter wall. Locations this rich occur more than once in Orkney, but the Ness held obvious geographical importance on the landscape. The significance is evidenced by the spatial orientation of stone structures and megaliths around the Ness that, in turn, offer insight into the ceremonial activities of the Neolithic inhabitants.

 During my time at the Ness of Brodgar, I excavated a broad range of artifacts including decorated pottery and flagstone, worked bone, stone tools, and structures. I also recorded the progression of the excavation via site mapping, section drawing, and various forms of artifact documentation. My experience also included attending lectures, traveling to other archaeological sites, and working with geophysical instrumentation, leveling stations, and flotation tank.

 I found that the evidence for Neolithic ceremonial activities at the Ness of Brodgar includes both material remains and spatial relationships that reveal a web of connectivity between the Ness of Brodgar and surrounding sites. This research brings to light a people who constructed their cultural identity through their architecture and its orientations. These sites, 5000 years later, retain significance by providing an essential purpose for the inhabitants of Orkney to both teach and preserve their history in parallel to the growth of urbanization and tourism. Modern society in the Orkney Islands now serves as a prime example of how we can keep hold of the past, while also engaging with a changing world.


 SC150 9:05
Sponsor: Constantine Hadavas

Lindsay Crawford '18
Batavia, Illinois
Major: Comparative Literature

Code-switching among English-speaking Learners of German in Marburg’s International Undergraduate Study Program

 This research, conducted during an introductory linguistics course at Phillipps-Universität Marburg, examines the German and English code-switching habits among English-speaking students studying German in the International Undergraduate Study Program (IUSP) at the university. This presentation will examine how different factors may influence the frequency of code-switching, including the speaker’s proficiency level in their non-native language. I will also attempt to analyze for a difference in frequency between "participant-based” and “discourse-based” code switches. Previous research has suggested that learners of a foreign language within a classroom setting may exhibit similar code-switching habits to bilingual speakers, and this research will examine whether or not the same patterns emerge outside of a classroom setting. In order to study these patterns, I gathered data from the speech of IUSP students in natural group settings and took advantage of the fact that IUSP students were previously divided into levels of German language proficiency ranging from A1-C1 for participation in German language and conversation classes. However, data was collected in settings where IUSP students were socially gathered outside of a classroom setting, and code-switching occurred naturally without the influence of a teacher or other authority figure. The results of this research could provide insights into methods of foreign and second language acquisition, and the mechanics of language-learning as a social process.


 SC150 3:00
Sponsor: Christine Johnson

Elena Cusack '18
Olympia, Washington
Majors: Theatre, Dance, and Media Studies: Dance; Critical Identity Studies

Re-discovering the Meanings of Contemporary Dance in Denmark, Italy, and Malta

 Study outside of Beloit offers the opportunity to gain new points of view and understanding about the arts. I spent the entirety of my junior year abroad, studying dance at institutions in three main locations: Denmark, Malta and Italy.

  I spent the fall in Copenhagen, Denmark; dancing outside of the academic institution in which I was studying. Initially, I was unsure of how involved I would be in dance while abroad, but realized that dance was too big of a part of my life to allow it to be absent. Within my first month abroad in Denmark, I applied to study in Malta in a dance-intensive program the following spring.

  In Malta, I experienced multiple styles of contemporary for the first time, including safety release and Countertechnique. My initial experience with Countertechnique was one of confusion. It was very different from the styles I was studying daily, and my body couldn’t comprehend it. Through a partnership with the Malta program, I had the opportunity to spend a month studying dance in Italy in summer 2017 and was immersed in daily Countertechnique. Finally prepared to explore this new movement style, I quickly fell in love with it, and found new connections in my body I hadn’t explored before.

  Going forward, the amalgamation of a diversity of dance experiences in my body has affected the work I create and am a part of. As I look toward my time after Beloit, these experiences abroad, in conjunction with those at Beloit, continue to inform my work and my planned trajectory. They have taught me not only about dance, but about the willingness to seek out opportunities. What started out as a plan for four months abroad became just under twelve, and I became much more comfortable with the unknown and new experiences.


 SC150 1:05
Sponsor: Kylie Quave

Elise Daugherty '18
Greenwood, Indiana
Major: Anthropology
Minor: Critical Identity Studies

Sadie Record '18
Monmouth, Maine
Major: Anthropology
Minor: Music

Jeffrey Le '18
Alhambra, California
Major: Anthropology
Minor: Critical Identity Studies

Lauren Riggs '18
St. Paul, Minnesota
Major: Anthropology
Minor: Health and Society

International Experiences in Anthropology

 The field of anthropology, the study of humankind, consists of two main schools - American and British. Each have their own standards of study and practice, with differing theorists and notable anthropologists at the helm. Within each field are three (British) or four (American) subfields - archaeology, physical, cultural, and linguistic.

 The way that a discipline is experienced is shaped by the place in which it is learned. In the fall of ‘16 and the spring of ‘17 we were able to study abroad in Scotland, Ireland, and Hong Kong, allowing each of us to explore anthropology in different contexts and countries.

 Ethnographic research in Edinburgh, an archaeology class in Ireland, a study of archaeology of the modern world in Glasgow, and participant-observation fieldwork in malls in Hong Kong gave us a broader view of how anthropology is seen and practiced in different places around the world. In this panel we will be discussing the differences and similarities between our experience of anthropology at home and abroad.


 SC150 9:55
Sponsor: Joshua Moore

Martha Denne '19
Zionsville, Indiana
Majors: Studio Art; Environmental Studies

Investigating the Role of Environmental Artists in Shaping the British Landscape: from Turner to Goldsworthy

 Turner revolutionized the landscape and transformed how people viewed the environment in the 19th century. Two hundred years later, the Sierra Club used coffee table books filled with Ansel Adams’ iconic photography to inspire environmental action. Environmental art has long been a tool for changing the public’s’ perceptions of the environment.

 Has it worked? Is it still working? Can the artist stimulate environmental action?

 I started with Turner by going to Margate to see the quality of light there that he obsessed over throughout his life. From there I went to London to see some of the works in the Tate Modern that have defined environmental art over the past century, like The Crystal Quilt by Suzanne Lacy and Condensation Cube by Hans Haacke. I commuted into Yorkshire Sculpture Park, which features permanent works by Andy Goldsworthy, one of the most prominent environmental artists in the 21st century.

 I hiked through the Lake District and rural parts of Scotland, two areas where art has been instrumental in altering social attitudes towards these environments and their people -- whether the land is portrayed as a wild beast to be tamed, or a haven for spiritual enlightenment. Here, in the very north of Europe, the environment has a complicated past.

 Throughout this trip I made a connection between environmental art and people’s mindsets. I had wanted to learn about how environmental art has evolved in the western world, and if this evolution has changed more than just the art world, as art tends to do. Come hear about my journey and conclusions!


 Richardson 1:30
Sponsor: Susan Furukawa

Hannah Epstein '18
Gastonia, North Carolina
Major: Japanese Language and Culture
Minor: Political Science

Gender Asobi: Playing with Gender in a Genderless Language

 Unlike the romance languages like French and Spanish, the Japanese language is commonly considered to be genderless. However, the Japanese language does have gendered reflexive pronouns, such as “I” and “we.” Namely these pronouns are the masculine ore and boku, and the more feminine watashi, but there remains no officially designated pronoun for individuals who identify as nonbinary. How exactly do Japanese pronouns work, and how are they used in a world where gender is becoming more of spectrum? Formatted as an extension of the panel hosted by professors of foreign language.


 Richardson 3:00
Sponsor: Donna Oliver

Matthew Estes '18
Portland, Oregon
Majors: Modern Languages; Religious Studies

Inside Russian Tourism and the Factors That Affect It

 During my time studying abroad in Moscow, Russia, in 2016, I completed a research project for the course "Moscow in Transition" on the tourism habits of Russian citizens. I had become interested in this topic after seeing so many Russians on vacation within their own borders. While I was abroad I visited numerous landmarks, museums, and tourist destinations, and I noticed that the volume of Russian visitors was far greater than that of foreigners. This piqued my curiosity about Russian tourism habits in general and internal tourism in particular. In my research I combed through statistics and was able to link current events in the international arena to an upsurge in internal tourism over the past 2-3 years. In my presentation I will outline the factors that play into Russians’ travel decisions, and I will connect those decisions to economics, history, geo-political events, and more. I will also share some of my personal experiences and observations to help develop this topic further.


 Wood 1:55
Sponsor: Marina Bergenstock

Samantha Funk '20
Kenosha, Wisconsin
Major: Theatre (performance)
Minors: Spanish; Religious Studies

You’re Worth Fighting For: Ometepe, Nicaragua says “Yes to Life”

 I lived another life for 6 weeks in a small town called Altagracia, on the rural island of Ometepe in Lake Nicaragua. While Altagracia was ridden with charm and beauty, it contained a deep darkness, in which I worked to brighten. For 6 weeks, I worked with a program called “Si A La Vida,” or “Yes to Life.” This Nicaraguan NGO worked with children who experience a variety of different traumas. Students come to “Si A La Vida” to grow as both students and individuals. The program uses a variety of different methods to reach one common goal: help children succeed. I brought theatre to Altagracia, and along with it came a sense of healing. Children wrote their own narratives surrounding what they believed a good relationship to look like.

  Together, we combated issues of trauma, unhealthy relationships, sexual assault, abuse, neglect, literacy, difference, racial tension, language, and more. The children I worked with experience this sort of trauma day in and day out. Theatre provided them with a new way to look at life and their experiences. The program works to change culture, prevent abuse and neglect of children as it hinders their academic and personal development as individuals. 40 hours a week, I sat in a classroom and devised a theatre workshop with students, giving them agency to speak out about issues of social inequality. This was presented to the families and community members in an attempt to educate the additional people supporting each child’s path throughout life. I also taught English classes, worked with students on their homework, danced with them, laughed with them, and cried with them. Come join me in my symposium in which I’ll speak of my journey, I hope it will be as meaningful to you as it was to me.


 Richardson 9:30
Sponsors: Daniel Youd and Sue Swanson

Gabrielle Garcia '19
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Majors: Environmental Geology; Dance

Jennifer Pantelios '19
Chicago, Illinois
Majors: Environmental Geology; Environmental Biology

Hanlin Zhang '20
Chengdu, China
Major: Environmental Geology

Flood Prevention and the Yellow River, China

 Our project focuses on changes in human modifications to the Yellow River. Flood prevention near the Yellow River on the North China Plain consists, in part, of three types of flood control: parallel dikes, modern reinforcement structures on river banks, and ancient compacted earthen walls. Parallel dikes are built to protect the population closest to the river. Modern bank reinforcements are near the river and are used to prevent erosion. The ancient compacted earthen walls were built to protect the city of Kaifeng from flood destruction and were intended to keep water out of the city. We will present information collected in China during summer 2017.


 SC349 11:00
Sponsor: Joshua Moore

Aaron Glavin '18
Yorkville, Illinois
Majors: Health & Society; Business Economics

Moi Yamazaki '18
Fukuoka, Japan
Major: International Relations
Minors: Health and Society; French; Music

Emily Blackburn '18
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Majors: German; Creative Writing; Literature
Minor: History

Yiqiang Wang '20
Beijing, China
Major: Undecided

Accessing Health Services Abroad Panel

 This panel will feature the experiences of Moi Yamazaki’18, Emily Blackburn’18 and Yiqiang Wang’20 in accessing various health services in Morocco, Germany, and China respectively. Panelists will reflect on their experiences in the countries they visited, share what they wish they had known about accessing health services abroad before they visited these countries, and offer advice to students considering studying abroad.

 In addition to listening to student experiences, Aaron Glavin’18 and Josh Moore from the OIE will be sharing the progress that Learning Enrichment and Disability Services and the Office of International Education have made in collecting information and creating new resources regarding accessing health services abroad. This initiative was prompted by student feedback.

 Initiatives include: new web resources, the results of a survey sent to study abroad partners, the development of a new procedure and release of information form for students with disabilities who are interested in pursuing accommodations abroad, and more.

 Bring questions, experiences, and concerns about managing your health abroad using medical services, mental health services, prescriptions, or disability services to this session!

 Your feedback may be used to provide more information about accessing health services to students considering studying abroad in the future.

 This panel is Brought To You By: Learning Enrichment and Disability Services (LEADS) and the Office of International Education (OIE)


 Wood 11:25
Sponsor: Pablo Toral
Clive Bruzas (SIT Durban)

Grace Glover '18
Rochester, Minnesota
Majors: International Relations; Health and Society

Art and Identity in Durban, South Africa

 This study examines the art and stories of artists in Durban, South Africa to better understand the way that cultural narratives shape value and expression in visual arts. Interviews, observation, and experience collected over the course of five weeks in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa have been compiled into an autoethnography about art and artists in a divided society. During this time, I took an internship with Umcebo Design, a group that coordinates artists, communities, and art pieces. Autoethnography is employed in order to synthesize something out of a collection of stories while recognizing my own positionality in context and exploring the connections between my research process and the process of art making. I found that many people are reflecting their racial identities and that race plays a role in how art is then valued and even categorized as art. The distinction between art and craft is highly superficial and derived from Western understandings of “what is art”. Ultimately, this project seeks to better understand South African art in the context of South Africa and its people.


 Wood 3:25
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Sophia Hale-Brown '18
Portland, Oregon
Majors: Anthropology; Sociology

The Importance of Traditional Diets: Dietary Change as an Instrument of Cultural Genocide of Ojibwe People in the United States and Canada

 Traditional Ojibwe diets have been affected by colonial pressures and environmental injustice against Native Americans. Looking at the diets of native peoples in the Boundary Waters, this presentation will consider ways that food serves as both an instrument of cultural genocide and a form of resistance against colonial pressures. During the summer of 2017, through the Coe College Field Station located in Northern Minnesota I participated in an environmental justice course. With my classmates I conducted visual sociology, participant observation, and interviews to understand the perspectives and narratives of stakeholders in the Boundary Waters in consideration of environmental justice: the equal distribution of resources for individuals of different race, ethnicity, gender, class, and socioeconomic status. Using texts and experiences from the class, testimonials, newspapers, and pictures of posters and displays, I explored the historical significance of food for the Ojibwe and how colonization has de-incentivized a traditional diet through displacement and assimilation. I also review the current threat mining poses for the land where the Ojibwe used to seasonally migrate to gather food, and the current state of the cultural and physical health of the Ojibwe people. Cultural genocide refers to the forced disappearance of a culture through the dispersion and assimilation of a people. Changes in access to land and resources has altered the traditional diet of the Ojibwe. I will show how food has been both an instrument of cultural genocide and environmental injustice as well as a method to preserve Ojibwe culture by reinforcing individuals’ identities as Native American or First Nations.


 Wood 9:05
Sponsor: Katie Johnson

Carlton Henning '18
Westfield, Wisconsin
Major: Biochemistry

Current Research on Nerve Degeneration in Canines

 Dogs are one of the most popular pets in America, yet many owners are unaware of common disorders. Many breeds of dogs undergo nerve degeneration that causes paralysis of muscles in the larynx and hind legs. During the summer of 2017, I worked in a research lab at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine to spread awareness of the condition, conduct research that addresses the mechanism of how the disease develops, and analyze the possibilities for the high prevalence of the condition in specific breeds.


 Richardson 3:25
Sponsor: Donna Oliver

Agnieszka Jarzabek '18
Norridge, Illinois
Majors: Business Economics; Russian

The Emergence and Treatment of New Religious Organizations and Cults in Post-Soviet Russia

 The fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 lifted the iron curtain and opened up Russia’s religious marketplace. As a result, many international religious organizations and cults see some of the highest membership rates among Russians. My research covers three such organizations: Aum Shinrikyo, a Japanese doomsday cult; Hare Krishnas, a new-age Hindu organization; and the Church of Scientology, the franchise, new-age religion based on L. Ron Hubbard’s work.

 In my presentation I will explore the cultural and political reasons for the surprising popularity of new religious organizations and cults in Russia; I will also examine the reactions and backlash that these organizations face from the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian state. Finally, I will share my personal experiences of visiting some of these churches in Moscow--from bare-foot dancing around a Krishna shrine to getting interrogated about my personal defects by a Russian Scientologist.


 Wood 11:00
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Jeremy Jessin '18
Austin, Texas
Major: International Relations: Environmental Studies, Justice and Citizenship

An Assessment of the Chlorocebus pygerythrus Population on Misali Island, Pemba: A Population Census and the Impact on Biodiversity and Human

 This study observes the vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) of Misali Island located off the western coast of Pemba Island. A population census of vervet monkeys was conducted in order achieve a more complete understanding of the terrestrial aspect of the island. This was executed by conducting a bait count method in the regions in which the monkeys are concentrated. Each individual was observed in order to conduct a behavioral analysis to determine the vervet’s impact on the biodiversity and their relationship with humans (fisherman, tourists, and rangers) on Misali Island. The vervet monkeys of Misali Island were introduced to this habitat an undetermined amount of time ago, and have adapted to living within the island’s conditions. Two separate troops were identified on Misali. Each troop lives in proximity to human infrastructure to benefit from human food. In the troop to the north; 17 monkeys were counted. In the troop to the south; 21 monkeys were found. In total, on the island there are 38 living vervet monkeys. Significant behavioral differences were observed between the two troops which stem from one troop’s ability to utilize the humans to their advantage better than the other troop. Not only did the troops have different behaviors, but both troops’ behavior differs from mainland vervets. This is due to Misali’s isolation and remoteness where predators are no longer a concern. This collection of data will further improve the management of the monkeys in order to conserve the biodiversity, maintain the productivity of the terrestrial ecosystem, and give a recommendation on how to manage the monkeys’ presence on Misali Island. This presentation will tackle a variety of subjects including; the environmental sciences, biology, and animal behavior. The presentation will be aimed at people with these specific interests, however, anyone interested in studies within eastern African and/or Africa as a non-traditional study abroad location could find this presentation educational.


 SC150 11:00
Sponsor: Cristina-Grazia Parente

Katherine Jossi '20
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Major: History, Political Science

Ava Rockafield '20
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Studio Art

Liam Flynn '20
Naperville, Illinois
Major: Anthropology and Classics
Minor: Museum Studies

Field Experience Grant Panel

 In this panel presentation, four recipients of the Field Experience Grant will share the lessons they learned and the insights they gained as a result of their individual international summer experiences. Each of these students worked for two semesters to develop a project proposal that would allow them to explore an interest or an academic discipline. From a Beloit Blocks course to self-designed research, these projects exemplify the different ways that students have put the liberal arts in practice in an international setting.

 Join us in journeys exploring the history-filled museums and churches of Rome, the importance of transportation in Amsterdam, and the vibrant art world of Barcelona. More importantly, come to hear how their travels impacted them on a personal level from dealing with projects that didn’t go as expected, to traveling internationally for the first time and learn how they will build on these experiences moving forward.


 Wood 1:05
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Lucas Kempf '18
St. Louis Park, Minnesota
Majors: International Relations; Spanish
Minor: Latin American Studies

Safeguarding Against the Military in Argentina

 Much of 20th century Latin American politics can be noted for the cycle of military dictatorships replacing weak democracies across the region. Military junta leaders were used to actively engaging in politics, often coming from elite families that leveraged unequal influence from using the armed forces to reinforce their demands. Democracies failed to prevent military coups, resulting in the establishment of authoritarian regimes. However, since the last wave of democratization militaries have remained in the barracks, seemingly unwilling or unable to affect contemporary politics. How and why have the militaries in South America stayed outside of politics since their fall from power?

 The last two decades of the 20th century witnessed the delegitimization of military regimes across the region. Newly formed democracies capitalized on political opportunities, managing to systematically dismantle the military’s power by gradually implementing civilian control over them. From 1988 until 2006, Argentina successfully established civilian oversight over the military apparatus. The government limited the military’s ability to participate in politics by dividing internal and external security forces into two separate legal distinctions and creating a defense ministry to exercise top-down control. Punishment of several key leaders for human rights abuses also played an important role in establishing civilian control over the military apparatus.


 Wood 9:55
Sponsor: Ellen Joyce

Elizabeth Lewis '18
Brooklyn, New York
Major: History
Minor: English

Macrohistory and Microhistory: Comparing Archival Spaces

 This past summer, I was a curatorial intern at the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, which operates an archive composed of over 60,000 documents and artifacts. Some of these items include the Articles of the Confederation, George Washington’s Inaugural Address, and the Declaration of Independence. I am also a student worker at the Beloit College Archive, which chronicles the college’s history and operates a large diary and oral history repository, to name only a few of its collections.

 During my summer internship, I began to ponder and compare the uses of these two archives, in both their potential and realized uses for students and the public. What projects and questions could a student pose in the Beloit College Archive that they could not in the Gilder Lehrman Archive? Alternately, what could a student accomplish at Gilder Lehrman that they could not at Beloit? These are some of the questions I will attempt to answer in my symposium.

 It also became quickly apparent in my internship experience that the Gilder Lehrman Archive struggled with some of the same issues as the Beloit College Archive. Questions of keeping up with developing software and maintaining a relevant digital presence were ever-present at the Gilder Lehrman Institute, much in the way that these concerns are present in Beloit’s archive. This presentation will highlight these similarities as well as broach the ways in which the two archives’ trials and tribulations differ.

 Through this comparison, Beloit’s archival strengths and weaknesses can be seen in a new light, one which will hopefully create space for meaningful growth for the future.


 Wood 2:35
Sponsor: Paul Stanley

Yifei Li '18
Beijing, China
Majors: Physics; Philosophy

Conducting Summer Research as an International Student in United States

 During the summer, I secured work as a research assistant for Dr. Erik Henriksen at Washington University in St. Louis, focusing on two-dimensional materials in solid-state physics. I conducted an experiment using an Atomic Force Microscope to measure the etching rate of an Argon Mill on ruthenium (III) chloride of different thickness. Using a scanning electron microscope, I designed and wrote lithography patterns on mono-layer graphene. I was also responsible for fabricating samples of ruthenium (III) chloride and graphene as well as shadow masking them for future measurements of their resistivity versus the temperature. I was able to manually shadow mask macro-scale grids on nano-scale samples and found a way to exfoliate flakes that are more likely to give thin and uniform sample pieces.

 In the presentation, I am going to talk about my research experience in detail. I will mention how I adjusted to the research in a field that I am not familiar with. I will also discuss how I secured the research position and give some instruction to other international students who want to get a summer research opportunity.


 Richardson 1:55
Sponsor: Jennifer Esperanza

Shuangyan Li '20
Beijing, China
Major: Undecided

My Internship Experience in Manila, the Philippines

 For two weeks this summer, I went to Manila, Philippines for an internship with PETA Pacific, an animal rights organization. As a recently developed city, Manila gave me a different perspective to view what it means to be an “international” or cosmopolitan city.

  Besides the different people who work at the Manila office every day, they are connected to staff located in Shanghai, Sydney, and Cambodia, to name a few places. The information I was dealing with for my internship was from everywhere around the world. I went to poor neighborhoods while doing "Passay Pubs:" volunteer work in helping stray dogs in an area called Pasay. This activity is a great example of how PETA, as a large international organization, operates at the local level.

 Aside from meeting people through my internship, I also had the opportunity to meet people through “couch surfing” and “Pasay Pubs.” This allowed me to meet more than just ex-pats, but also local Filipinos. Surprisingly, people I met there are friendly and optimistic. As a person who grew up in a big city, all of these experience refreshed my imagination toward Manila. This presentation will help everyone here see Manila from a totally new perspective-a city hidden in an undeveloped country with plenty international working opportunities. This presentation will help everyone see Manila from a totally new perspective-a city hidden within a "developing country" with plenty of international working opportunities.


 Richardson 11:25
Sponsor: John Rapp

Yizhe Li '19
Xinxiang, China
Major: International Relations
Minor: Psychology

Sihan Qu '20
Suzhou, China
Major: History
Minor: Political Science

What’s the China Factor in the Political Development in Hong Kong?

 This research will start with a brief introduction of modern Chinese history and an examination of some important political developments that took place in the last century on the Chinese mainland. Hong Kong, a territory ceded by the Qing dynasty to Britain in the 19th century, was returned to China in 1997. In the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984, Beijing promised Hong Kong would continue to have a free-market economy, political autonomy, and its own legal system under the Basic Law, or mini-constitution, that was put in force in 1997. Furthermore, Beijing promised that the Chief Executive would be chosen by popular election by 2017. However, after the Tiananmen Square Incident happened in Beijing in 1989, many Hong Kong residents started worrying about Hong Kong’s future. In the past two decades, many disputes have arisen over whether Hong Kong has true autonomy and democracy. The proposed revision to Article 23 of the Hong Kong Basic Law was the first controversy that drove thousands of people to protest on the streets on the 6th anniversary of the handover. The electoral system is seen as rigged against the pro-democracy parties by basically giving out half of the seats in the Legislative Council to the Beijing-backed camp via functional constituencies, or indirectly elected seats from select interest groups. Furthermore, Beijing demands to vet the candidates before voters go to the polls in the promised direct election of the Chief Executive, which eventually led to the “Occupy Central” movement in Hong Kong and contentious debates on the streets or on the Internet. We will use images, quotes and personal experiences to further demonstrate different political opinions and ideologies held by people from mainland China and Hong Kong.


 SC150 11:25
Sponsor: Lawrence White

Lucia Lobosco '18
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Major: Psychology
Minor: Biology

Jessica Lam '18
Los Angeles, California
Major: Health & Society

Navigating Multiple Identities While Studying Abroad

 Studying abroad is highly encouraged at Beloit College, and it is during this time when individuals grapple with various ideas about self-identity and independence. We studied abroad at the University of Sussex in England and at the University of Almería in Spain in the spring of 2017. Beforehand, we were advised that we might experience some animosity, but we were unprepared for the "negative American stereotype" that was only heightened by Donald Trump’s election. From the perspective of two women with multiple racial and cultural identities, it was often challenging having to navigate our own personal identities, being that the label of "politically naïve American" followed us wherever we went. This historical event, Trump’s victory, highly influenced our experiences both in and outside of class, despite living and studying in different European countries. In our symposium we will focus on our experiences in relation to our racial, cultural, and economic identities, while trying to maneuver through stereotypes that we encountered while abroad.


 Richardson 1:05
Sponsor: Nicole Truesdell

Charlotte Mayeda '18
Oxnard, California
Major: Political Science
Minor: Law and Justice

Intersectionality in Hong Kong

 Like two worlds colliding into one, my study abroad experience in Hong Kong brought into perspective parts of my own identity as an Asian American and gave me new insight into the politics and legal system of China. Learning both inside and outside of the classroom was central to my growth and development abroad, this required a commitment to constant exploration and stepping outside of my comfort zone.

 Through this presentation I will explore what it means for someone to live in another country coming with their own set of beliefs and how those beliefs will intersect both positively and negatively with their experiences abroad. Understanding the importance of being uncomfortable, but also having the ability to accept this feeling is pivotal to having an enriching and fulfilling experience abroad. Furthermore, I will evaluate my understanding of how I took up space in an already very crowded country and what that means for someone who doesn’t have to permanently live there. Lastly, I will address what it meant to be an American abroad during the first 127 days of the new presidency and how my country of origin intersected with the other domestic and exchange student while I was abroad.

 Being conscious of the intersections of your identities and the treatment of those identities wherever you go abroad is important your experience. Come learn about how my own experience abroad shaped what I learned as well as what I would do differently if I could do it again.


 SC150 2:35
Sponsor: Amy Sarno

Ricky McMurry '18
Santa Monica, California
Major: Theatre Performance
Minor: Classics

Viel Lärm um Nichts: Shakespeare by the Lake in Upper Austria

 To be involved in a Shakespeare production is an invigorating challenge for anyone passionate about theatre. Working with the intricate and poetic language is an exciting undertaking for any actor, director, or designer. When I learned that the Open House Theatre Company in Vienna was planning on performing Much Ado About Nothing, I was eager to get involved. In my interview, I was surprised to learn that the company was no longer performing the traditional version, but a German translation. Despite having only an elementary level of German proficiency, I joined the company as a production assistant. I spent the next several months assisting in the casting, construction, and directing of a play I could not understand. Though I was familiar with the English version of the script, connecting with an adaptation translated not only into German, but adapted even further into an Austrian dialect called Mundart was immensely challenging.

 Being one of the only native English speakers in the cast gave me a unique perspective on the process as a whole. We often had to switch back and forth between English and German versions of the play to effectively reach a translation while still doing justice to the poetic nature of the language. Dialect also played a large role in the editing of the script, as we had to analyze several regional vernaculars in order to maintain a cohesive voice. Utilization of both English and German interchangeably was essential to our success in the project. Different dynamics between languages emerged over the process, and the company essentially ended up speaking in an English and German hybrid. As a result, our show explored aspects of language, dialect, and cultural identities in modern Austria.


 SC349 1:05
Sponsor: Joshua Moore

Jordyn Murch '18
Aurora, Colorado
Major: Health and Society
Minor: Political Science

Kina McCombs '18
Granville, Ohio
Major: Biochemistry
Minor: Spanish

Rylie Partin '18
Adamant, Vermont
Major: Sociology

Audrey Summers '18
Grand Marais, Minnesota
Major: Creative Writing
Minor: Journalism

MacLain Peacock '18
Rockford, Illinois
Major: Psychology
Minor: Health and Society and Music

Gabe Pearlman '18
Hawthorn Woods, Illinois
Major: Applied Chemistry
Minor: Biology

Erick Mitchell '19
San Antonio, Texas
Major: Media Studies

Athletes Abroad: You can do it!

 Are you an athlete? Are you interested in studying abroad? Come join us as we share our experiences as Bucs abroad. We will be discussing how we were able to continue to work out, play our sport, and maintain contact with our teammates and coaches at Beloit. In addition to this, we will share how going abroad affected us individually and contributed to our development as athletes.

 In our group, a variety of sports and study abroad programs are represented, and thus, we each have a unique story to tell.

 Our hope is that our experiences encourage other athletes to take advantage of the many opportunities that studying abroad has to offer.


 Richardson 2:35
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Nissa Parker '18
Lincoln City Unknown
Majors: International Relations; Environmental Studies
Minor: Biology

Planting Trees in Jordan

 While studying abroad in Jordan, I had the opportunity to intern with a local NGO called the Arab Group for the Protection of Nature that works on regaining sovereignty over natural resources in Jordan and Palestine in order to ensure that those resources are managed sustainably and distributed equitably, particularly in areas of conflict. With them I worked on educational initiatives, researched barriers to food sovereignty in Jordan, and volunteered at tree planting events hosted by the organization. Predominantly, however, I was an observer learning about environmental inequities that exist in the region. Using the framework of environmental justice, we can understand that environmental inequities occur when there is unequal access to resources. In Jordan, rapid urban expansion, deforestation, neglect of the agricultural industry, and climate change have lead to desertification that threatens the rich agricultural tradition of the Jordan Valley, disenfranchising Jordanian farmers as it has become easier for Jordan to simply import produce from more developed countries. In Palestine, Israeli occupation and sustained violence continuously threaten the welfare of Palestinian farmers and their access to resources. In my presentation, I will discuss what I learned through participating in this internship and the challenges I faced while asking us to consider the value of the simple act of planting a tree as a physical and symbolic act of resistance.


 Richardson 9:55
Sponsors: Daniel Youd and Sue Swanson

Desire Piphus '20
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Major: Environmental Geology

Linh Do '20
Hanoi, Vietnam
Major: International Relations
Minor: Asian Studies

YiQiang Wang '20
Beijing, China
Major: Undecided

Rivers in Transition: Connecting Geological History and Material Culture in Henan Province

 In the summer of 2017, a group of Beloit College students and professors in the Rivers in Transition program went to China to carry out field research about the Yellow River system and its surrounding region. Our main focus was to compare the geological materials collected and observed in the field to the historical maps. We also connected the geological history of these areas to material culture. The type of data used in this research consists of pictures, drawings, observation notes, and direct material analysis in the field.

 We spent nearly two weeks doing research in three locations in Henan Province: Kaifeng, Anyang, and Gongyi. Within those two weeks, we visited a museum in Anyang to observe oracle bones and bronze vessels that had been excavated from burial sites. We examined the geological makeup of the Imperial tombs, Buddhist caves, and a sacred mountain (Mt. Song) in Gongyi. In Kaifeng, we explored the city, learned about the dams that are set in place to contain the Yellow River, and collected samples from the Yellow River. This experience allowed for us to gain more knowledge of the geological and cultural history of Henan Province.


 SC150 1:30
Sponsor: Leslie Williams

Mustafa Quadir '20
Karachi, Pakistan
Majors: Biochemistry; Anthropology

Excavating a Medieval Cemetery in Hågerup, Denmark

 The Christian cemetery of Hågerup spans the period from the 12th to the 16th centuries CE and contains an estimated 700 graves. In the first year of a five to eight-year excavation, 19 skeletons were analyzed for skeletal and dental indicators of sex and age. The human remains were also examined for skeletal indicators of leprosy, tuberculosis, syphilis and trauma.

 This presentation will begin with an introduction of the historical context of the excavation site. An overview of the osteological methods used to determine age and sex in human remains will follow, including the drawbacks of the methods currently used.

 Finally, the presentation will share the obstacles presented due to the differences between the Danish and North American archaeological methods, and my position as the least experienced member of team.


 Richardson 11:00
Sponsors: Daniel Youd and Sue Swanson

Simone Rawal '20
Kathmandu, Nepal
Major: Environmental Geology, Computer Science

Nicholas Bone '19
Libertyville, Illinois
Major: Evolution, Ecology and Behavior Biology

Dexter Kopas '18
Seattle, Washington
Major: Geology

Architectural Changes to Cultural Features in Kaifeng, China Related to Flooding Events

 We set out to investigate how the city of Kaifeng in China’s Henan Province has changed in the last 2000 years. Our guiding questions were how historical pasts have been preserved, how the city has changed with flooding, and how the use of spaces have changed -- all using a base map from 1898 compared to the current layout of the city. During the Rivers in Transition program in May 2017, we, along with our research group and students from Henan University, visited several historical sites in Kaifeng’s old city. From these investigations, we discovered direct evidence of 1642 and 1841 flood events in the histories of temples and other buildings, many being destroyed or damaged by these events. The layout has remained relatively static in the last century, with most streets from the 1898 map remaining. However, the general uses of spaces and buildings have changed, such as the commercialization of many religious and imperial buildings, the conversion of guild buildings, and transitions such as a Buddhist temple changing to a Muslim mosque. Additionally, we noted vast urbanization of main streets, new developments and planned residential areas throughout the city.


 SC349 10:35
Sponsor: Elizabeth Brewer

Dakotah Revai '18
Waupaca, Wisconsin
Major: Physics
Minor: Computer Science

Rob Robinson '18
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Business Economics
Minor: Studio Art

Maclain Peacock '18
Rockford, Illinois
Major: Psychology
Minor: Health & Society

Jeffrey Le '18
Alhambra, California
Major: Anthropology & Cris

SEL Students Study Abroad: How You Can Afford a Semester Abroad

 Do you find yourself thinking “I could never afford that,” when contemplating study abroad? If so, some study abroad alumni are here to tell you that you’re not alone. Come listen to a panel of SEL and other low-income, first-generation students who made study abroad work for them as they share the secrets of their successful study abroad experiences. There are ways for everybody who can afford Beloit College to afford study abroad. Hear how they made study abroad an affordable venture, with and without the support of external scholarships such as the Gilman. Hear how they made study abroad an affordable venture, and also take the opportunity to ask questions about how you can make study abroad work for you.


 Wood 9:30
Sponsors: Nancy Krusko and Shannon Fie

Julia Ring '18
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Major: Anthropology
Minor: Museum Studies

Public Lands, Public Archaeology, Public Stake

 A small building, built by the Dutch over 400 years ago, stands next to an idyllic beach on St. John. The warm, salty air makes the frigid Wisconsin January weather seem like a bad dream. Our class of five has arrived at Cinnamon Bay, located in the Virgin Islands National Park for a field course in public archaeology. Our objective: to excavate a unit for the installation of an informational sign about historic and archaeological site in Cinnamon Bay, while also delving into the purpose and benefit of public outreach and inclusion into fieldwork.

 Balancing public interest and land protection is difficult, especially with limited funding. External agencies, like Friends of the Virgin Islands National Park, bridge the financial gap to make the parks run as successfully as possible for the benefit of visitors, conservation, and cultural resources. By looking at the history and intentions of the National Park Service, as well as these partnerships that align with national parks and supplemental funding, I will be looking at the status of archaeological influence on land management and cultural conservation.

 For both the Virgin Islands National Park and St. John, the future is uncertain. With 90% of the island destroyed by hurricanes Irma and Maria, the devastation is heartbreaking. Residents’ homes and livelihoods are gone, the Cinnamon Bay lab, standing strong since the 1600s, is gone, and the status of the other ruins on the island are unknown. Relief efforts are only just beginning, and only time will tell what lies ahead.


 Wood 1:30
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Laura Savage '18
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Major: International Relations
Minor: French

On the Ground vs. in the Office: Experiences Working in a Mexican Migrant Camp and in an Embassy

 In the summer of 2016, I received a Weissberg Human Rights grant to volunteer at a migrant center in southern México. I was working with refugees and immigrants fleeing violence in poverty in Central America, mostly Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras. My impression of immigration completely changed after interviewing people upon arrival and hearing how young teenagers, even as young as 11 years old, were forced into the gangs like the maras salvatruchas and had to constantly pay bribes or they were threatened. I found out that, especially in El Salvador and Honduras, these gangs practically ran the country and had even infiltrated into the government. As I volunteer bandaging people’s feet, dishing out food, registering people when they arrived, I often heard the stories recounted many times.

 Five months later I received an internship at the Embassy of Honduras in Brussels during my time abroad in Belgium. On my first day, already knowing the volunteer work I did, my boss hinted that she had little to no interest in human rights. Many of the embassy employees denied that the 2009 Honduran coup d’état happened and a few outspokenly supported Donald Trump despite his charged rhetoric against Hispanic populations. Even though the embassy received letters from organizations like Amnesty International seeking for statements about human rights, especially after the murder of Berta Cáceres in Honduras, these types of letters were often brushed off. Many of the embassy employees especially in the area that I interned in were much more concerned with trade agreements and bring more economic opportunities of Honduras, but were much less concerned about human rights there and did not discuss that. My views on human rights were challenged as an intern, but anybody who wants experience in the field of human rights and international affairs will be interested in this symposium.


 Richardson 9:05
Sponsor: Greg Buchanan

Jiming Song '19
Shenyang, China
Major: Psychology
Minor: Anthropology

Yizhe Li '19
Xinxiang, China
Majors: International Relations; Psychology

Current Psychological Therapies and Mental Health Care in China

 The ways in which we conceive and define mental illness, mental wellness, and psychotherapy vary by time and place. This presentation will focus on comparisons between China and the United States by presenting data and reports from official organizations in both countries.

 Although psychotherapy is offered as a form of care in both countries, there are vast differences in terms of how and when it is utilized, what treatment modalities are available, and what training is needed in order to become a professional therapist.

 Confidentiality of patient records also varies between the two countries, as do a variety of other government rules and policies along with public perceptions of mental illness and psychological treatment. These differences have been the subject of decades of research in cross-cultural psychology that has often yielded conflicting results and the occasional casually racist interpretation.

 We hope that our audience will come away with a better understand of the mental health systems in both countries and what it means to be a psychotherapist or psychiatric patient in China or the United States. Because the American system is more developed, knowledge of how it operates may help in the future development and direction of mental health care in China.


 SC349 1:30
Sponsors: Jim Schulte and Elizabeth Brewer

Leslea Strauss '18
Golden Valley, Minnesota
Majors: Environmental Biology; Education and Youth Studies

Dakotah Revai '18
Waupaca, Wi
Major: Physics
Minor: Computer Science

Student Panel on Studying Abroad in the Sciences

 One of the fundamental features of Beloit College’s Mission Statement is that students will learn to live in a diverse society and gain international and interdisciplinary perspectives. While many of our STEM majors will study abroad, there are many that don’t consider the experience because they may be overwhelmed with how to get all their required classes in before graduation or may be confused about the process. Others may feel there are barriers that will exclude them from studying abroad. This student led panel hopefully will dispel some commonly held myths about study abroad and answer any questions you may have about studying abroad if you are a STEM major.


 Wood 10:35
Sponsor: Nancy Krusko
Dr. Pastory Bushozi (University of Dar es Salaam)

Kendra Weinrich '18
Mondovi, Wisconsin
Majors: Anthropology; Biology

Faunal Evidence of Dietary Preferences of Homo erectus from Makuyuni Region, Northern Tanzania

 The introduction of a diet supplemented by animal protein and fat is generally considered to be the source of the rapid increase in human brain development over the last several hundred thousand years. This new behavioral adaptation generated unprecedented growth of the neocortex, the region of the brain associated with reasoning abilities and language, especially in Homo erectus. In our human ancestors, this growth provided a basis for forethought and planning skills, eventually leading to the manufacture of increasingly complex tools and the ability to process animal carcasses. This study involved the excavation of 527 various tool fragments and 31 mammalian fossil fragments from the upper and lower Makuyuni 4 beds near Makuyuni, Tanzania in the hopes of associating potential butchery marks on fossil fragments with tool fragment types. Due to the poor surface preservation of the fossil fragments, it was not possible to determine the presence or absence of butchery marks on the fossil fragments. However, the abundance of tool fragments suggests tool manufacturing by Homo erectus was prominent in the area.


 SC150 3:25
Sponsor: Lisl Walsh

Mad Welt '19
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Molecular, Cellular and Integrative Biology
Minor: Classical Civilization

Madison Innis-Skinner '20
Santa Cruz, California
Majors: History; Classical Civilization

Kierin Jackson-Ramos '18
Rockford, Illinois
Majors: Anthropology; Classical Civilization

Katrina Dwyer '19
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Major: Classical Civilization

How to be Roman--The Nerd Edition

 Ah Rome, city of ancient beauty, site of many a movie set or gathering. An iconic collection of monuments of old--and a very real, very modern society living among and within them. Validate your TrenItalia ticket (if you can figure out how to do that), and keep an eye on your luggage while we explore both Roma’s physical majesty and our own psychological baggage it brought to light. For two weeks, four American students endeavored to fit into a foreign society, all the while seeing with our own eyes and feeling with our own skin the remains of a city and people that, up until then, we had only a foggy notion of from our texts. Join us for an experience of immersion and the influence of race on culture shock, a story of stone splendor, and the war several students raged against the ugly specter of Anxiety and mental illness while abroad.


 Wood 3:00
Sponsor: Charles Westerberg

Jesse Wiles '19
Wooster, Ohio
Major: Sociology

North America’s Northern Pacific Coastal Cedar Populations and Glaciers: A Case Study in a Global Context

 The effects of warming on the cryosphere and ecological systems across the planet have been dramatic. This is especially the case in southeast Alaska where large glaciers and ecosystems are responding to warming, loss of snowpack and the transition of snow to rain. The loss of large glaciers such as the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska and the decline of Alaskan Cedar trees are two examples illustrative of the changes in Southeast Alaska. Effects of this type can be applied globally as anticipated warming modifies glaciers and ecosystems in the world’s mountain systems.

  Alaskan Yellow-Cedar tree decline has been attributed to loss of snow pack, in part driven by the transition from snow to rain and early melting coupled with harsh frosts that damage roots that are exposed due to a lack of snowpack. All of these factors lead to tree mortality. However, once the climate is warm enough and hard frosts become less frequent the trees have the potential to thrive. Meaning the cedar decline may be temporary.

  In contrast the loss of glacial ice is irreversible and the warming along with transition of snow to ice leads to the profound loss of ice and changes in river hydrology.

  These well-documented warming impacts can provide insights for anticipating changes globally. For example, these findings from Alaska pertain to other regions throughout the rest of North America, Asia, Europe and South America where similar threshold temperatures are being crossed and where mountain systems are glaciated.


 Richardson 10:35
Sponsors: Daniel Youd and Sue Swanson

Ziming Wu '20
Dongguan City, Guangdong Province, China
Major: East Asian Studies

Pictorial Representations of the Yellow River Landscapes in Qing Dynasty Historical Sources

 Focusing on the question of “to what extent do the artistic conventions of the eighteenth century Chinese maps relate with observable features of the actual landscape in Henan Province, China,” we have spent a semester looking at Chinese river maps (河圖 he tu) from the Library of Congress Collection and gone on a field trip to Henan for ten days.

 During the field trip, we went to some major local mountains, including one of China’s Five Sacred Mountains (五嶽 Wu Yue)—Mt. Song (嵩山 Song Shan), also known as Mt. Taishi (太室山 Taishi Shan), studying rock formation and looking for features that might correspond with pictorial representations of them in the river maps and images of them in local gazetteers. We have also been to some rivers and local monuments, such as several imperial tombs of the Northern Song dynasty (北宋 Bei Song) (960-1127).

 Through the information collected during the field term and some later analyses, we have been able to reach some conclusions. We have recognized three salient characteristics of pictorial representations of the actual landscape features—coloration, generalization, and exaggeration—in both the river maps and the gazetteers. We will expand on these three points during the International Symposium presentation.

 We are also glad to have the International Symposium presentation as part of the long term project. There are more to be done, and we will keep on with the research. For example, we are doing a special project during this semester, studying mapmaking and gazetteer compilation in China during the Qing dynasty (清朝 Qing Chao) (1644-1911), Chinese painting techniques, and Western influence on Chinese cartography, etc.


 SC150 9:30
Sponsors: John Rapp and Daniel Brueckenhaus

Mingyi Zhang '18
Shandong, China
Major: Political Science
Minors: European Studies; German

Conflicts in Holocaust Atonement: The Transformation of the WWII Nazi Concentration Camps in Germany

 By the end of World War II a massive amount of crimes conducted by the Nazi regime in concentration camps was revealed across Europe. As Germany was divided into four occupation zones, the usage of the former concentration camp sites differed based on the degree and type of denazification in each zone. This presentation compares the memorial sites of Dachau and Buchenwald in order to show how the U.S. and Soviet occupation authorities differed relating to their retrospective views of Nazi war crimes, and how later policies related to the past differed between East and West Germany.

 KZ-Dachau near Munich was first used by the U.S. military government as an internment camp for former Nazi officials after 1945. As the Bavarian government returned to power, competing pressures arose from local citizens and international survivor groups regarding the usage of the campsite, which led first to government destruction of the site and, in the following years, to demands for its reconstruction. In contrast, KZ-Buchenwald in Weimar was turned into the Soviet Special Camp No.2, allegedly for denazification purposes, but in fact leading to the death of thousands of innocent Germans. In East Germany the ruling communist party turned Buchenwald into a commemoration site of communist martyrs to glorify the communist resistance against fascism, which essentially dissociated the camp from the Holocaust.

 The transformation of both camps demonstrates the colliding ideas of redemption and victimization among Germans as well as the ideological conflicts between East and West Germany. Both Dachau and Buchenwald became national memorials for Nazi crimes after the German reunification, but new conflicts unavoidably arose regarding the purpose of the camps. Each of these sites is not only valuable as a memorial for victims of the time, but also as an epitome of conflicting identities in postwar Germany.


Funding for International Opportunities for Beloit College students

Funding for study abroad
  • Study Abroad Enhancement Grants (for projects undertaken during study abroad) lead to a better understanding of the lived realities of the host culture(s) through experiential learning activities. See: http://www.beloit.edu/oie/. May be applied for in either the fall or spring semester.
  • Benjamin Gilman Scholarships support costs associated with study abroad for Pell Grant recipients. See http://www.iie.org/programs/gilman-scholarship-program. Applications are due the semester prior to the study abroad.
  • Class of 2008, Burris, Schroeder and Luke Somers Scholarships for off-campus study. For Beloit College students with significant financial need. No application required.
  • Boren Scholarship for the study of less commonly-taught languages in world regions considered critical to U.S. interests. U.S. citizenship required. See: https://www.borenawards.org/boren_scholarship/basics.htm. Applications are due in January.
  • Scholarships made available by study abroad organizations to students enrolling in these organizations' study abroad programs. See individual program information. For example, SIT matches Pell Grants.
  • Funding for summer projects
    The grants and fellowships listed below are administered by the Initiatives Program, Office of International Education, and the Liberal Arts in Practice Center. Some are exclusively for international opportunities and all of them use a Common Application. See: http://www.beloit.edu/lapc/funding/beloitonly/. The deadline for the Common Application is the Monday after Spring Break. Information about other funding opportunities can be found at https://www.beloit.edu/lapc/funding/.
  • International Education Grant for projects that "enable students to apply their studies to an international context".
  • Weissberg Human Rights Grant for off-campus research, internships and conference attendance in the field of human rights.
  • Venture Grant for current sophomores to participate in entrepreneurial, self-testing, or intellectually challenging projects that benefit both the student(s) involved and others. Projects may be of a personal, service, or commercial character, and may be completed independently or through an organization.
  • Bacon Super-Vision Fellowship for participating in any low-paid or unpaid summer internship.
  • Class of 1986 Field Experience Fellowship for current juniors participating in any low-paid or unpaid summer internship.
  • Mikva-Cohen Endowed Internship Fund for pursuing intensive summer internships with a preference for experiential opportunities in three areas: performing arts, social justice activism, and practical politics.
  • Martha and Alan Stutz Grant Fund awarded for travel and research abroad, living expenses associated with summer internships, off-campus research and travel. While open to students in all disciplines, preference is given to students in Art History, Anthropology and/or Museum Studies who will commit to presenting at the Student Symposium.
  • Society for Learning Unlimited Grant for Internships or Community-based Research for community-based academic study during the summer or academic year.
  • Kohler Fund for Community Engagement for educational opportunities that encourage community engagement for students and faculty, such as, but not limited to internships.

  • Many of the students presenting in this International Symposium received funding for their projects and studies from one of these sources. Thanks are due to the donors who make these opportunities possible.

    The Symposium is organized by George Lisensky, Chemistry Department.

    The word cloud was created by G. Lisensky using the Symposium abstracts and www.wordclouds.com. The larger the font for a given word, the more frequently that word appears in the abstracts.


    Link to the online program

    See pdf abstracts: