Beloit College International Symposium, November 16, 2016

The International Symposium celebrates Beloit College as an international college. In this fifteenth annual event, 65 student presenters and 40 faculty sponsors and moderators will directly participate as Beloit students share their international studies with the community.


Names of presenters in the schedule link to their abstract. The bars between abstracts link back here. Link to pdf.
Richardson Auditorium, Morse-Ingersoll Hall
 
Moderator: Charles Westerberg, Department of Sociology
9:00
Charles Westerberg
Opening remarks
9:05
Salzburg: A City Paved with Theatre History
9:30
Maria Theresa’s Marriage Politics: Research, Transcription, and Translation in the Austrian Library and Archive System
9:55
Study Abroad in Divided Societies
10:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Edward Muston, Department of Modern Languages & Literatures
10:30
Edward Muston
Opening remarks
10:35
Children Not Living a Fairy Tale: Early Childhood Education Experiences in Denmark
11:00
Social Psychiatry - Danish Mental Health Care in Action
11:25
The Golden Age of Postcard Propaganda in Post-Revolution Ireland
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Shatanjaya Dasgupta, Department of Economics & Management
1:00
Shatanjaya Dasgupta
Opening remarks
1:05
The Gentrification of London Boroughs
1:30
Telling 1916: Exploring Narrative Presentations of Ireland’s Easter Rising
1:55
Transformative Learning in Practice at the University of Limerick in Ireland
2:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Michelle Bumatay, Department of Modern Languages & Literatures
2:30
Michelle Bumatay
Opening remarks
2:35
Pausanias at Kenchreai: What Was Written and What Remains
3:00
Global Migration: Case Studies in France and Southern Mexico
3:25
Insights into the Middle East
3:50
Break
 
 
Room 150, Science Center
 
Moderator: George Williams, Department of Art & Art History
9:00
George Williams
Opening remarks
9:05
Jizō Statues, Mizuko Kuyō and Health: Applications of a Japanese Buddhist Tradition in US Health Care
9:30
Why Survivors of Japanese WWII Tragedies Retell Their Stories
9:55
Museum Narratives: Examining Victimhood and War Responsibility in Japanese Peace Museums
10:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Pat Polley, Department of Physics & Astronomy
10:30
Pat Polley
Opening remarks
10:35
Japan’s collective memory on the Pacific Wars and World War II through an Economical Lens
11:00
Traumatized Objects of World War II Japan
11:25
War and Peace: Museums, Memory, and National Identity in Japan
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Tamara Ketabgian, Department of English
1:00
Tamara Ketabgian
Opening remarks
1:05
Race and Identity in Study Abroad
1:30
Diverse Foreigners in the Rural North of Homogeneous Japan
1:55
Bloody Taboos; Dealing with Menstrual Stigmas in India
2:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Rachel Ellett, Department of Political Science
2:30
Rachel Ellett
Opening remarks
2:35
Mzungu, Obruni, Toubab: Being American in Sub-Saharan Africa
3:00
Evolution of Identity through Study Abroad: Moroccan Influences and My Practice of Islam
3:25
South Africa: How has 48 Years of Apartheid Tainted the Education System?
3:50
Break
 
 
Wood Room, Mayer Hall (second floor)
 
Moderator: Susan Swanson, Department of Geology
9:00
Susan Swanson
Opening remarks
9:05
Selective Beauty: Environmental Injustice in the Boundary Waters
9:30
Transformative Outdoor Education through the Yukon Territory, Canada
9:55
A Demographic Analysis of Polish Immigrants in Chicago: Trends and Predictions
10:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: Yvonne Wu, Department of Music
10:30
Yvonne Wu
Opening remarks
10:35
Perezosos y Pura Vida: Experiences with Costa Rican culture and independent field research
11:00
Volunteering in Guatemalan Health Care
11:25
Adventures in Guatemala: City, Village, Culture and Maya people
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Matt Tedesco, Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies
1:00
Matt Tedesco
Opening remarks
1:05
Designing Drugs for Dengue and Other Tropical Diseases in Ecuador
1:30
How to Gain Confidence Speaking Another Language?
1:55
An Hour Late for a Pisco Sour: My Immersion in V Region Chilean Culture
2:20
Break
 
 
Moderator: M. Shadee Malaklou, Department of Critical Identity Studies
2:30
M. Shadee Malaklou
Opening remarks
2:35
My Life Underwater: Marine Research in the Galápagos Islands
3:00
Changes in Activity Levels of Parasitized Paracalliope fluviatilis and Austridotea annectens in the Southern Island of New Zealand
3:25
Disaster and Recovery: Community Resilience in Christchurch, New Zealand
3:50
Break
 
 
Room 349, Science Center
 
Moderator: Leslie Williams, Department of Anthropology
10:30
Leslie Williams
Opening remarks
10:35
Bodies and Busses
11:00
Shifting Faith in Granada, Spain
11:25
#BeloitinSpain
11:50
Break
 
 
Moderator: Kristin Labby, Department of Chemistry
1:00
Kristin Labby
Opening remarks
1:05
Anatomy of a Glaciovolcanic Ridge in Reykjanes, Iceland
1:30
Materials Research in Fribroug, Switzerland - The Synthesis and Analysis of an Azulene End-functionalized Polymer
1:55
Study Abroad and Perspectives on the College Experience
2:20
Break
 
 
Science Center Atrium
 
10:00-12:00 
Truth and Disillusion Surrounding Studying Abroad

Abstracts

 Wood 1:55
Sponsor: Sylvia Lopez

Samantha Abrams '17
Gaysville, Vermont
Major: Spanish

An Hour Late for a Pisco Sour: My Immersion in V Region Chilean Culture

 During my five months living and studying in Viña del Mar and Valparaíso, Chile, I had the privilege of learning a massive amount of information about Chilean culture, specifically in the fifth region (or “V Region”) of the country. Through both academic learning and social/community immersion, I learned a great deal about various cultural elements that are quite distinct from my experience living as a United States citizen.

 Topics I will touch upon in this symposium include: theater and the performing arts (or lack thereof); treatment of international students both academically and socially; strikes and protests in higher education; family roles/structures; role of alcohol and bread; abortion laws; and classism/materialism.

 I selected these cultural elements because of all topics I could discuss I find these to be the most salient. They are the ones that I have had some of the most significant experiences learning about and witnessing. I am confident that my audience will be intrigued to learn about a handful of aspects that make life in central Chile quite different than in most (if not all) of the United States, and that have forever changed my perspective on the power and relevance of culture in the forming of societal lifestyle.

 Richardson 1:55
Sponsor: Rongal Nikora

Marina Bagnoli '17
Berea, Kentucky
Major: Health and Society

Transformative Learning in Practice at the University of Limerick in Ireland

 The value of a liberal arts education lies in the inherent breadth and depth of the instruction. Students are first encouraged to explore the realm of academic disciplines and later provided the chance to dive deeper into their direction of interest, sometimes leading to a program of study outside the United States. My interest in physical therapy led me to a semester of study at the University of Limerick in Ireland. Many European universities offer limited flexibility in terms of exploration at the undergraduate level. Students are expected to decide upon their career path prior to enrollment and to follow a specific course trajectory to meet the requirements necessary for immediate employment following graduation. In my case, I was able to merge my liberal arts background with a hands-on, career-focused, engaging approach to education at a European university. My broad background as a Health and Society major at Beloit had introduced me to health and wellness and the program of study abroad provided a context to consider various applications of my interest in health. While most classes I took in Ireland were related to physical therapy, it was the material I encountered in my Neurological, Sensory, and Musculoskeletal Nursing course that inspired me to reconsider my vocational interests. Soon thereafter, I made the cognitive shift from my earlier interest in physical therapy to nursing, a field more suitable for my personal goals and aspirations. Beloit provided the roots of my education, the University of Limerick offered the opportunity to grow and expand my thinking about professional health-related possibilities, and pursuit of a nursing degree upon completion of my studies at Beloit will hopefully represent the fruit that emerges from the seeds planted at Beloit and nurtured at the University of Limerick.

 Richardson 10:35
Sponsor: Sonja Darlington

Chen Bao '17
Xi’an, Shaanxi, China
Majors: Education; Economics

Children Not Living a Fairy Tale: Early Childhood Education Experiences in Denmark

 I studied abroad at Copenhagen, Denmark in spring, 2016 through DIS (Danish Institute of Study Abroad) program. During my semester aboard, I participated in the core course called Child Development in Scandinavia. Along with the core course, I also took courses related to children and the natural world. Aside from attending classes, I volunteered to take care of children from three to six years old at a local kindergarten one day a week and took a study tour to Helsinki to experience Finnish early childhood education as well. From what I have learned, experienced, and observed, I found that early childhood education in Scandinavian countries emphasized helping children become more independent and that pedagogues/teachers not only provide children care and love but also treat kids as “human” before they treat them as “children.” Particularly noteworthy, I learned that early childhood education in these countries values the importance of the natural world, e.g. forest, gardens and animals. During my presentation, I will focus on the development of children’s independence and interactions with nature in Denmark and Finland. I will share my stories and observations as a volunteer in the kindergarten classroom, my experiences of visiting a Nature Center in Finland, and my participation in the Animal Olympics. Through all these activities, I learned that Danish children are not taught to live in a fairy tale, but rather they are encouraged to cope with their vulnerabilities.

 Richardson 11:25
Sponsor: Shawn Gillen
Susan Schreibman (Maynooth University)

Emily Blackburn '18
Brookfield, Wisconsin
Majors: Creative Writing; Literary Studies; German
Minor: History

The Golden Age of Postcard Propaganda in Post-Revolution Ireland

 A key battleground of the 1916 Irish rebellion was Irish and British public opinion. Although historians have focused their attention on the various aspects in which both sides attempted to sway opinion in their favor, either through radio programming, posters, tailored newspaper articles, or other means of propaganda, one of the largely overlooked means of promotion was through postcards.

 From about 1900 to 1915, penny postcards were an incredibly popular and convenient way to correspond, sending two messages at once – the short letter on the back, and the possibly significant image on the front. This trend remained strong during and after World War I. When I was searching for letters over my winter break 2015, I met with an archivist at the Milwaukee Irish Fest Center. They had over 140 postcards in their collection, most of them blank, but all of them featuring some aspect of the 1916 Easter Rising on the front. Those pictures of martyred revolutionaries and the destruction wrought by the British would have been widely spread, raising awareness and increasing public outrage. Better still, those postcards would have been sent internationally, while the British were trying to keep information about the brutality of the Rising quiet.

 While working with at An Fora Feasa, an Irish Studies institute at Maynooth University, I came across many similar postcards, dating before and after the Easter Rising, and could see the scope of their usage. This helped to fuel my research into the importance of postcards as propaganda in the war for Irish independence. I will focus strongly on that impact, while giving background on the events of the 1916 Rebellion, and the effects of that revolution.

 SC Atrium 10:00-12:00 
Sponsor: Elizabeth Brewer

Sara Brown '17
Grinnell, Iowa
Majors: French; Anthropology

Truth and Disillusion Surrounding Studying Abroad

 The aim of this study was to open up a discussion on what people expected study abroad would be like, and how it compared to their actual experience. The study also looked at how the gap between the two impacts a student’s understanding of the value of their experience. Findings will be presented in the Science Center Atrium, where students will be able to contribute to an art project on perceptions of study abroad.

 SC150 3:00
Sponsor: Elizabeth Brewer

Carrie Campbell '17
Allegan, Michigan
Major: Religious Studies
Minor: Anthropology

Evolution of Identity through Study Abroad: Moroccan Influences and My Practice of Islam

 In Autumn of 2014, a series of significant events lead me to take a leap of faith, quite literally, and convert to Islam. This immense life decision was a catalyst for so many choices that I made from that point on. I became a Religious Studies major as a result of my increasing interest in Islam, which allowed me to pursue one of my aspirations of traveling abroad. Not only was I able to travel abroad, but I was able to take that opportunity and really frame it in a way that allowed me to explore myself and what it means to carry the identity that I have accumulated. As Islam had become so central to my personal life as well as my studies, it was important for me to find a place where Islam was very visually present. Morocco appeared to be a good fit for what I was looking for with my experience.

 In the process of getting to know the country, culture, and people at Al Akhawayn University in Morocco as well as outside campus borders, I learned a lot about myself and what it means to for me practice Islam. There is nothing monochromatic about the way Islam inhabits each person who comes into contact with it. The religion itself is dynamic, but the way individual people practice it is very different, and, as I have learned over the past few years, deeply rooted in personal choices and experiences.

 By no means has my transition to a religion that has been so controversially seen in the United States been easy, but the paths it has led me down have allowed me to grow significantly and learn how to get to know who I am.

 Wood 3:25
Sponsor: Jo Ortel

Amelia Diehl '17
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Majors: Environmental Communication and Arts; Literary Arts

Disaster and Recovery: Community Resilience in Christchurch, New Zealand

 Using the city of Christchurch, NZ as a case study, this talk will cover interdisciplinary approaches to understanding how people recover from disaster, what disasters reveal about community and cultural values, and what disasters mean for environmental studies. Since the 6.3-magnitude earthquake that killed almost 200 people on February 22, 2011, Christchurch has been undergoing a major rebuild, mobilizing students, volunteers, artists and engineers to create new organizations and innovative projects to address a cultural, social, economic and environmental crisis. This notion of natural disaster will be contextualized within the broader framework of climate change and the threats – and opportunities – that poses for community growth.

 SC349 1:05
Sponsor: James Rougvie
Meagen Polluck (Wooster College)

Carl-Lars Pedersen Engen '17
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Major: Environmental Geology

Anatomy of a Glaciovolcanic Ridge in Reykjanes, Iceland

 Undirhlíðar ridge on the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwest Iceland is a glaciovolcanic tindar formed by fissure eruptions under ice. Previous studies in two quarries along the ridge show that this specific tindar has had a complex eruption history. In June and July of 2016, my Keck Geology Consortium research group studied the ridge in its entirety, mapping out geologic units, and collecting data necessary for determining the sequence of eruptive events that formed the landscape. This work will inform us of what processes are active in glaciovolcanism. In order to communicate the implications of our work to a broad audience, I am constructing two “map tours” of the ridge: one that is centered on the abandoned and accessible Undirhlíðar quarry, and another that describes features along the upper part of the ridge between the quarries. Stops along the tour include exposures of dikes, pillow lavas, and erosional alcoves within the ridge’s central tephra cone. The goal of these tours is to compare similar units across the ridge and quarry and to show the general anatomy of a glaciovolcanic ridge.

 SC150 1:05
Sponsor: Beth Dougherty

Steven Esparza '17
Chicago, Illinois
Major: International Relations

Oceana Gilliam '17
Los Angeles, California
Majors: Political Science; Russian

Jeremy Sullivan '17
Ashburn, Virginia
Major: Japanese
Minor: Critical Identity Studies

Nyasha Nyamhondoro '17
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Major: Education and Youth Studies
Minor: History

Race and Identity in Study Abroad

 Study abroad is often stereotyped as an activity for white women, and both nationally and at Beloit College, white women are over-represented in study abroad. However, in fact, a wide range of Beloit College students study abroad, and study abroad can benefit students no matter their gender, race, ethnicity, or other identity markers.

 In this panel discussion, four students of color will talk about their experiences living, studying, and working in Japan, Jordan/Morocco, Russia, and the United Kingdom. They will reflect on how their international experiences shaped and were shaped by their identities; discuss their levels of (dis)comfort while abroad and the factors that contributed to this; identify the assets they brought with them that helped them successfully navigate a new cultural context; and discuss how the insights they gained about identity abroad have impacted them upon return.

 SC150 11:25
Sponsors: Susan Furukawa and Joy Beckman

Sasha Feinberg '17
Evansville, Indiana
Major: Japanese Language and Culture

War and Peace: Museums, Memory, and National Identity in Japan

 In this presentation, I will look at how modern-day Japanese peace and war museums depict children during World War II, and also how these museums present information about World War II to the children of today. The museums we visited incorporated different techniques to distribute information, and most included some kind of interactive exhibit such as a stamp rally or a game or simulation. My focus will be primarily on the Showakan, a museum meant to document the sufferings of the Japanese people during World War II. The Showakan creates a different experience for adults and children, part of which involves having two separate pamphlets containing different information. I have translated the pamphlets and will cover some of differences I have found.

 In addition to viewing the physical artifacts and written testaments, one of the more unique aspects of our trip was being able to interact with museum curators and hibakusha (survivors of the atomic bomb) who had experienced the events such as the Tokyo air raids and the atomic bombs first-hand. Being able to have the stories of World War II being passed down directly from the person who has experienced it, is very moving and brings up the concern of how the number of people who are able to share their personal stories is decreasing and what that will mean for future generations.

 Richardson 9:55
Sponsor: Beth Dougherty

Patrick Fraser '17
Montpelier, Vermont
Major: International Relations
Minor: History

Julie Weinberg-Connors '17
Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts
Major: Critical Identity Studies

Madeline Hart '17
Madison, Wisconsin
Major: Biochemistry
Minor: Health and Society

Melissa Korniejczuk '17
Palos Hills, Illinois
Majors: Psychology; Critical Identity Studies

Study Abroad in Divided Societies

 Many of the places where students study abroad struggle with issues of national identity and unity along dividing lines such as ethnicity, language, religion, economic status, and culture, as well as less visible cleavages such as the role of secularism, historical memory, and migration/immigration patterns. Some societies are able to manage their cleavages peacefully, while others may fall victim to eruptions of violence or even civil war. Four students will discuss their experiences studying in Belgium, Israel, Northern Ireland, and Turkey, all deeply divided societies. They will reflect on how these differences manifest themselves to outsiders, the (un)successful strategies that governments employ (or fail to employ) to manage these differences, and how security concerns shape and are shaped by local understandings of difference, as well as how the insights they gained abroad are applicable to the U.S.

 Richardson 9:30
Sponsor: Daniel Brueckenhaus
Stefan Wedrac (IES Abroad- Vienna)

Emma Frothingham '17
Corvallis, Oregon
Majors: History; Music; German

Maria Theresa’s Marriage Politics: Research, Transcription, and Translation in the Austrian Library and Archive System

 During my time in Vienna, Austria, I was given the opportunity to do an individual research project in the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek (Austrian National Library) and the Österreichische Staatsarchiv (Austrian State Archive) under the supervision of Professor Stefan Wedrac. My research focused on the political implications and benefits gained through the marriages of Empress Maria Theresa’s many children, specifically her oldest son Joseph II’s first marriage to Isabella von Parma. Through her strategic planning, Maria Theresa was able to increase both her empire and her political ties to other European royal families. The weddings of her children were, by all accounts, political events rather than simply celebrations. Through documents and artwork depicting the wedding festivities and the planning that went into Joseph and Isabella’s wedding, one can see how politically significant the event was and see how the single event affected long-term relations between the Habsburg and Bourbon families.

 In addition to this, I will talk about my experience working in a German-speaking archive and library as an American student, and the many challenges that came with the language barrier, including transcribing and translating German script from the 18th century and interacting with staff members at the archive. Although I do speak German, it was at times very difficult to conduct research in a language that is not my native language. Through my research, I was forced to become comfortable with older script and to make mistakes both in my writing and my interactions with others, however the experience of doing this research was one of the most significant experiences I believe I will ever receive.

 Richardson 1:30
Sponsor: Shawn Gillen

Madison Ganson '18
Mundelein, Illinois
Major: Creative Writing
Minor: Spanish

Telling 1916: Exploring Narrative Presentations of Ireland’s Easter Rising

 The 1916 Easter Rising, with its cast of vibrant characters, tragedy, and injustice on a grand scale, cannot be easily contained into a singular narrative. One hundred years later, the events, participants, and ideas surrounding the rising persist in Irish culture in ways as complicated as the Rising itself. Both in the special project class I took with Professor Shawn Gillen in Spring 2016 and during the month I spent in Ireland the following summer, I interacted with different constructions of the Easter Rising in my work with the Letters of 1916 Project and my experiences with commemorative museum exhibits.

  Working with the Letters of 1916 Project, a digital humanities initiative that focuses on letters sent to or from Ireland in 1916, gave me a unique view into life during 1916. This work was especially useful because the project features not only the lives and stories of the most prominent members of the rising, but attempts to cultivate a nuanced and diverse representation of the realities of living in Ireland in the year 1916.

  During my time living and interning in Ireland, I visited multiple museums in Dublin, many of which paid tribute to 1916 through commemorative exhibits, taking unique approaches to presenting the rising and its characters. Many of these exhibits focused on specific members of the rising and cast the conflict itself in a variety of ways. During this symposium, I will discuss my experiences with the narrative construction of the Easter Rising, both in correlation to my work with the letters project and my experience with museum exhibits.

 SC349 11:25
Sponsors: Gabriela Cerghedean and Sylvia Lopez

Martin Todd Garrett-Currie '16
Chicago, Illinois
Majors: Spanish; Health and Society
Minor: Political Science

Sophia Rogers-Davidson '19
Chico, California
Major: Sociology
Minor: Spanish

Jonathan Hoffmann '19
Grayslake, Illinois
Major: Business Economics

Baylee Slevira '18
Billings, Montana
Major: Biochemistry

Natalie Gallagher '19
Felton, California
Major: Spanish

Sarah Hartz-Martin '18
Saint Cloud, Minnesota
Segovia, Spain
Major: Modern Languages

Rosalind Vang '19
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Major: Studio Art

#BeloitinSpain

 ¡Saludos desde España!

 Join us as we take a journey across medieval and modern Spain! Come learn about our experience with water sustainability, intercultural literacy, self-identity, and Spanish history. Our summer block course spent 10 days in three different Spanish cities, Granada, Sevilla, and Córdoba, learning around these topics. The digital story we have created compiles the sights and sounds of our time in southern Spain and discusses the relationship we built with the country’s culture. Our images will excite you and our stories will tantalize you. Though we were only abroad for a short period of time, we developed nuanced knowledge of a world vastly different from our own at Beloit College. We witnessed first hand the ways in which coexistence in Spain has created a diverse, rich culture, which we quickly learned to adore. Our hope is that our experience with Beloit Blocks and the #BeloitinSpain course will entice our fellow Beloiters to embark on similar journeys of their own. Following the presentation, we will answer questions about our experiences and conduct a dialogue we hope will further encourage others to follow in our footsteps.

 SC150 2:35
Sponsor: Elizabeth Brewer

Thaowan Giorno '17
Bangkok, Thailand
Major: Environmental Biology

Samantha Poyer '17
Annapolis, Maryland
Majors: Religious Studies; Anthropology
Minor: French

Alexis Sabor '17
Norridge, Illinois
Major: Health and Society
Minor: Political Science

Macy Tran '17
White Bear Lake, Minnesota
Major: Health and Society
Minor: French

Mzungu, Obruni, Toubab: Being American in Sub-Saharan Africa

 What images come into your mind when you think about studying abroad in Africa?

 From Kony 2012 to the Lion King, we’ve all been exposed to pop-culture ideas about Africa. But what is it like to live and study in one of the continent’s 54 countries, such as Ghana, Senegal, or Tanzania? Join us in an intersectional panel and discover what studying abroad in Sub-Saharan Africa is really like for each of us. We will discuss what expectations we had before traveling to our host countries, how we navigated gender, religion, race, class, and nationality during our stay, and how we adjusted to the U.S. after our return. In confronting our identities while studying abroad in Africa, we turn a critical and vulnerable lens on what it means to be mzungu, obruni, and toubab, and what those labels meant and still mean to us.

 SC150 9:05
Sponsor: Joy Beckman

Claire Hahn '17
Clinton, Wisconsin
Major: Art History

Jizō Statues, Mizuko Kuyō and Health: Applications of a Japanese Buddhist Tradition in US Health Care

 In the years following World War II, Japan entered a period of rapid societal change with effects that resonated throughout the following decades. One of the most prominent changes—in terms of its prevalence and importance in daily life—was the naturalization and acceptance of abortion as a valid means of birth control. While this in and of itself raises a cascade of questions regarding the structure of Japanese society during this era, my research has been to study what follows abortion—the emotional anxiety, trauma, and distress—and how many Japanese women cope.

 In recent medical journals, it has been acknowledged that many women experience symptoms that mirror that of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following an abortion. This is a problem that is largely unaddressed in the United States due to the political tensions surrounding the ethics of abortion. However, in Japan there has been an ongoing dialogue about abortion. Out of this conversation, the mizuko kuyō​ rite emerged among practicing Buddhists as a structured ritual to make peace with the lost child and with oneself. An integral part of this rite are Jizō​ statues, housed in Buddhist temples throughout Japan.

 My talk will address the connections between art, religion, and health; the cultural adaptation of this practice in the US; and finally, a phenomenon called "statue surrogacy."

 Wood 2:35
Sponsor: Kevin Braun
Maggy Brandt, Luis Venues, and Alex Hearn (Galápagos Academic Institute for the Arts and Sciences)

Clare Harper '17
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Biochemistry
Minor: Dance

My Life Underwater: Marine Research in the Galápagos Islands

 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador and another world away, the Galápagos Islands are a unique ecological treasure. I was fortunate to spend four months exploring the Pacific Ocean in the Galápagos Marine Reserve. I learned a lot about the culture and politics surrounding the Reserve through my courses in Marine Ecology and living with a local family. Since my program at the Galápagos Academy for Arts and Sciences had a field-work emphasis, I conducted several marine research projects surveying rocky intertidal, vertical wall, coral reef, and pelagic habitats. My professors were leading marine ecology researchers and their expertise informed our projects. The best method to understand and study marine ecosystems is by engaging with them, and my experiential learning and hands on research experience allowed me to do just that. I am excited to share my new found knowledge of the delicate, fascinating, important marine ecosystem of the Galápagos Islands.

 SC349 1:55
Sponsor: Kathleen Greene

Kelsey Horvath '17
Addison, Illinois
Majors: Education and Youth Studies Track 1; Spanish

Chen Bao '17
Xi’an, Shaanxi, China
Majors: Education and Youth Studies Track 3; Economics

Nyasha Nyamhondoro '17
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Majors: Education and Youth Studies Track 3; History

Will Banville '17
Woodstock, Illinois
Majors: Education and Youth Studies Track 3; Spanish

Sawyer Lindland '17
Evanston, Illinois
Majors: Education and Youth Studies Track 2; Spanish

Study Abroad and Perspectives on the College Experience

 This panel of five students who studied abroad prior to their enrollment in "What Is College For?"--a class that considers the goals and outcomes of a liberal arts education, have recognized and reflected on significant changes in both their perspectives on college in general, and their perspectives on their own college experience in particular as they returned to Beloit. The students will be reflecting upon their study abroad experiences in London, Puerto Rico, Spain, Denmark and Ecuador as well as their experiences returning to the Beloit community. Experiences abroad challenged and developed their perspectives on student participation and community on campus as well as the role of a college student, the intrinsic value behind living and experiencing campus life during undergraduate studies, development and reflection upon a student’s own values, beliefs and social interactions, awareness of changes of one’s identity, and opportunities to amplify their ability to connect with others and relate to people with different backgrounds.

 SC349 10:35
Sponsor: Theodore Gries

Joseph Emmett Hunhoff '17
Palos Park, Illinois
Major: Biochemistry

Bodies and Busses

 Last spring, I was in an abroad program at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Unlike many of my peers, I did not explore a research option and instead pursued a solely academic abroad experience centered on unique classroom opportunities I could only find in other schools. It is true our school has great undergraduate programs that expose students to elements of graduate school that many undergraduates won’t get to use, but being small we do have limited funding and facilities. We have NMRs, but not the 600 MHz, and we have anatomy, but we cannot work on cadavers. We also have the diverse but still limited community around us on campus-- I would like to emphasize that experiencing another countries’ culture, whether it be the brogue or history, is also a fundamental part of the abroad experience, and talking with people who have drastically different political backgrounds then you can be very eye opening, even on a all night bus ride. There are only a few crucial things often overlooked in abroad experience and those are scheduling, different study methods, and teaching methods.

 Richardson 11:00
Sponsor: Kristin Bonnie

Madeleine Ipsen '17
Orfordville, Wisconsin
Major: Psychology

Social Psychiatry - Danish Mental Health Care in Action

 Social psychiatry is the idea of making mental health care available to individuals outside of a clinical setting. It is fairly unique to Denmark in that the Danish citizens have access to healthcare, including mental healthcare, as part of their welfare system. While studying in Denmark in Spring 2016, I spent three hours per week working in a social psychiatry café. The café was an informal place for individuals who had been diagnosed with mental illness to learn skills to re-adjust and re-enter the workforce after hospitalization. My primary role was to spend time with the patrons of the cafe and to interview them to learn about their opinions of the Danish mental health care system. Based on my observations and interviews, I believe that social psychiatry can be effective for helping those who have been hospitalized for mental health problems. The café provides an opportunity for these individuals to spend time with others with shared experiences, and to encourage each other, and to grow together. Overall, I learned that community psychology systems, including social psychiatry, are effective in Denmark, in part because the welfare system allows people to have more access to healthcare and in part because the country is small enough that all people can utilize this welfare. While there are some aspects of the Danish mental health care system that the United States could adopt, such as the social psychiatry cafes, there are some aspects that would be difficult simply because of the size of this country, as well as differences in health care and education systems. Regardless, I will attempt to explain why the United States could learn a lot from Denmark in terms of how we treat mental health care.

 Wood 1:30
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Sarah Jones '17
Anchorage, Alaska
Major: International Relations
Minor: Latin America and Caribbean Studies

How to Gain Confidence Speaking Another Language?

 Studying abroad can be very challenging. Part of that challenge comes from language and cultural immersion. When I studied abroad in Quito, Ecuador I was not prepared to speak Spanish, nor was I confident in speaking Spanish. So how do you build confidence when speaking another language? This was a question I struggled with a lot during my year abroad. I found that by practicing, talking, speaking and being willing to make mistakes helped, but what helped me out the most was joining a debate team that was entirely in Spanish.

 For this presentation, I will talk about how my experiences being part of a university debate team in Ecuador helped me build confidence in speaking Spanish. Furthermore, I will discuss how interacting with my friends on a day-to-day basis gave me cultural knowledge, and how I was able to create a community for myself in an entirely different culture. Language immersion was the single most important factor in building my communication abilities while I was abroad, considering I had only spoken Spanish in a formal classroom setting before. I will also discuss how making mistakes is crucial in gaining confidence when speaking another language. The ability to speak another language is critical in today’s global society, so come hear about one student’s misshapes, adventures, and everything in between in her attempt to speak Spanish.

 Wood 3:00
Sponsor: Ken Yasukawa
Olwyn Friesen (University of Otago, NZ)

Katie Karl '17
Downers Grove, Illinois
Major: Ecology, Evolution, and Behavioral Biology
Minor: Geology

Changes in Activity Levels of Parasitized Paracalliope fluviatilis and Austridotea annectens in the Southern Island of New Zealand

 This presentation will focus on parasite-host dynamics in the South Island of New Zealand and how this research further applies to climate change and environmental policy. Approximately one third of New Zealand’s area is protected as a National Reserve and nearly 10% of the coastline is a designated Marine Protected Area. During my semester of study, I worked alongside a PhD student at the University of Otago examining changes in activity levels of parasitized benthic invertebrates. Our study took place in Lake Waihola, a brackish lake located in the Otago region that is partially protected under the Ministry for the Environment. Ultimately, this research shows conflicting relationships between the two species of hosts and their corresponding parasites. These conflicting relationships may indicate a form of co-evolution is occurring at the species level, explained by the Red Queen Hypothesis. These data will be compared across several years of parasite incidence in Lake Waihola to describe the effects of global climate change in marginal Marine Protected Areas and whether or not they are truly protected.

 SC150 10:35
Sponsors: Susan Furukawa and Joy Beckman

Hillary Kon '17
Shah Alam, Malaysia
Major: International Political Economy
Minor: Japanese

Japan’s collective memory on the Pacific Wars and World War II through an Economical Lens

 My focus on Japan’s collective memory on the Pacific Wars and World War II looks at the issue through an economic lens. Liberal museums present less bias viewpoints, mentioning not only Japanese suffering but also suffering caused by the Imperial Japanese Army. Conservative museums on the other hand tend to express the war solely from the then Japanese Militarist government’s point of view.

 Through the economical lens, I used prices and availability of food as an indicator of the market’s well-being. The shrinking portion sizes increased, as food sources quickly depleted, leading to the emergence of food-rationing systems in addition to a black market system. The narrative of food is an important aspect of collective memory because it allows for a comparison between an individual’s current financial situation versus the financial situation a normal nuclear family had to go through, despite the nation’s status of war victim or war perpetrator. The detailed depiction of nutrition can also make an impression on the perception of affluence, or lack thereof, on visitors as situations of hunger often invoke feelings of empathy in people.

 Furthermore, the narrative using economic goods can change the way museum visitors see Japan’s role in the war. Depending on the narrative presented, it can influence changes in morale in current and future generations.

 Wood 9:55
Sponsor: Diep Phan

Catherine Krol '17
Harwood Heights, Illinois
Major: International Political Economy
Minor: Anthropology

A Demographic Analysis of Polish Immigrants in Chicago: Trends and Predictions

 Polish identity can be found in many places in America, especially in the city of Chicago. Chicago’s claim to fame is: “The city with the largest population of Poles outside of Poland”. Whether this is true or not will be dissected in this symposium as well as other trends affecting Polish immigrant populations in Chicago.

 The product of this research was a final report for a Behavioral Economics course that I took while I studied abroad. I will set the background with a bit of history of Polish migration patterns in the last 150 years or so. Then, using statistics pulled from Census databases as well as other secondary sources, I will discuss the current trends of Polish migration outside the country, initial and current reasons for Polish settlement in the United States and the success rate of Polish immigrants’ economic transition to American life using factors such as income, occupation type and educational attainment levels to discuss their overall economic standing.

 Polish immigrants are an interesting case study because they have been displaced periodically through recent history. The purpose of this study was to understand how their cultural origins and experiences of acculturation have affected their pursuit in the American dream and whether their migrating behavior is set to change in the future.

 SC349 1:30
Sponsor: Kevin Braun

David Lafayette '17
Madison, Wisconsin
Major: Applied Chemistry
Minors: French; Math; Physics

Materials Research in Fribroug, Switzerland - The Synthesis and Analysis of an Azulene End-functionalized Polymer

 Mechanoresposive polymers are a relatively novel type of stimuli-responsive material that contain chemical motifs activated via physical stress which alter properties of the material upon cleavage. Recent examples of such polymers include self-healing films and plastics that change color when damaged. The molecular joint responsible for the material’s force reactivity is known as a mechanophore, which can be either covalently or non-covalently bonded. Non-covalent species of mechanophore may consist of hydrogen bonds, metal ligand coordination, or pi-pi stacking.

 During my time in Switzerland, I seized the opportunity to conduct preliminary research at Fribourg University’s Adolphe Merkle Institute. Under the guidance of PhD candidate Céline Calvino, I investigated a potentially mechanoresponsive material based off of the theoretical pi-pi stacking of the azulene motif. Azulene is an aromatic ten carbon system composed of a seven-member ring bordering a five-member ring. Most importantly for this application, azulene is a chromophore, thus exhibiting color that is affected by the motif’s electronic environment. Applying physical stress to a polymer conjoined by stacked azulene groups should thus produce a color change as the azulene separate from one another, destabilizing their electronic environment.

 In this presentation, I will primarily be presenting my personal research which consisted of the synthesis of a previously unreported azulene end-functionalized polymer and the evaluation of the material’s mechanoresponsiveness. However, some asides will be taken to make comment on the study abroad environment within which my work was conducted, which I would happily expand on in the subsequent discussion.


 SC150 3:25
Sponsor: Jennifer Esperanza

Constance Lee '19
Hong Kong
Major: Critical Identity Studies
Minor: Anthropology

South Africa: How has 48 Years of Apartheid Tainted the Education System?

 During the summer of 2016, I spent some time in the city of Durban, South Africa, understanding its educational and political system through the lens of three different schools with varying access to funding and resources geared towards student success. While there, I and a team of students spent two weeks volunteering at Addington Primary School, a school with predominantly black students. It is designated a "Quintile 5" school, meaning that it has access to roads, electricity, and tap water. However, the school still gets very minimal funding and, in theory, should charge every student. Most families could not afford paying the full fees, however, so many apply for fee exemptions. After comparing Addington with a comparable private all-girls school with more funding, I understood the big disadvantages that Addington Primary School was facing. I also spent a week in a rural area just outside Durban called Dokodweni, where I stayed with a sangoma (healer) and her family. I learned about the high rates of teenage pregnancy in the area. In this presentation, I will talk about my observations in these three school communities and how this allowed me to draw similarities and differences between my own education and of the system in South Africa.

 Richardson 9:05
Sponsor: Amy Sarno

Abigail McCully '18
Clinton, Wisconsin
Major: Theatre Performance
Minor: History

Salzburg: A City Paved with Theatre History

 Salzburg, Austria is a city obsessed with theatre. At every turn, you come into contact with a piece of Salzburg’s artistic history. From the naming of the streets, to the use of churches, Salzburg fully embraces the concept of the whole world being a stage. This presentation will explore the long history of Salzburg’s place in theatre history and will focus on the Salzburg Theatre Festival, a yearly event which celebrates Salzburg’s greatest artists.

 Topics covered in this presentation will include the construction of theatres and stages, Salzburg residents’ feelings towards Mozart, the festival’s theatrical marketing, and the connection between art and religion.

 SC150 1:55
Sponsor: Theodore Gries

Kathleen Anne McKenna '17
Warwick, New York
Major: Biochemistry

Bloody Taboos; Dealing with Menstrual Stigmas in India

 Despite menstruation being a natural phenomenon that roughly half the human population undergoes, it is still often shrouded in taboos and myths. While this is true in many countries, it is drastically visible in India. During my time in India, I was able to intern at a local non-governmental organization to develop an informational workshop for adolescent girls on menstrual hygiene and other aspects of self-care. This workshop was piloted twice during my internship. Most of the adolescent girls had no idea what menstruation was, despite already having experienced it. Throughout this experience I became interested in the different attitudes surrounding menstruation. I began researching various public health initiatives, traditions, and activists’ efforts.

 SC150 9:55
Sponsors: Susan Furukawa and Joy Beckman

Mieke Miller '17
Janesville, Wisconsin
Major: Art History
Minors: Museum Studies; German

Museum Narratives: Examining Victimhood and War Responsibility in Japanese Peace Museums

 Every country involved in World War II is responsible for the horrific violence which resulted in the deaths of innocent civilians. Yet despite this shared fault, nations often struggle to balance war responsibility with politics and public opinion. This struggle is evident in museums, cultural institutions which tend to avoid discussion of their country’s own wartime wrong-doings.

 This summer, funded by the AsiaNetwork Grant, I along with five other students travelled to Japan to examine Peace Museums, particularly those about WWII. In this symposium, I will discuss the narratives of some of these museums, such as the Yushukan Museum and Peace Osaka, and how they accept or ignore Japan’s war responsibility‒often due to political influence or bias, as well as any controversy they have faced because of their chosen narratives. In order to demonstrate these narratives, I will examine specific phrases in museum texts and note the inclusion or exclusion of certain WWII events. This symposium will show how such small details make a large impact on one’s understanding of Japan’s victimhood and Japan’s accountability in WWII. Additionally, I will also stress the importance of critical readings of museum texts and exhibits, and encourage attendees to reflect on their own experiences with museum narratives of war responsibility, just as I was inspired to do during my trip to Japan.

 SC150 11:00
Sponsors: Susan Furukawa and Joy Beckman

Emma Mooney '17
Fairfax, California
Major: Art History
Minor: Museum Studies

Traumatized Objects of World War II Japan

 Just as humans adjust to physical and emotional trauma, when objects witness or experience violence, they frequently shift in cultural significance and value. This type of symbolic transformation can be clearly understood in the context of Japanese museums and monuments of World War II. Here, in public view, mundane objects in often unrecognizable states are sacralized: mangled assemblages of metal, glass, and ceramic, melded into disfigurement by the flames of incendiary bombs; a tattered, button-down canvas shirt, stained with nuclear fallout; the fragment of a temple gate, a lonely survivor of the atomic force. These objects—simultaneously ordinary and extraordinary—remind us of the extremity of nuclear weaponry and of war as a whole; of the humanity of the victims and of life’s fragility, and of the destruction of spaces which once provided shelter and safety. This symposium presentation seeks to address the ways that the physical experiences of objects impact Japanese collective memory.

 Richardson 3:25
Sponsor: Beth Dougherty

Joe Peacock '17
St. Paul, Minnesota
Majors: Computer Science; Economics

Bradley Rydholm '16
Rockford, Illinois
Major: Political Science

Steven Esparza '17
Chicago, Illinois
Major: International Relations

Insights into the Middle East

 Only about 2% of Americans who study abroad go to the Middle East despite the outsize influence the region has on U.S. foreign policy and the pressing need for diplomats, business people, policy analysts, and other professionals with a working knowledge of the region. In this panel discussion, three Beloit students will discuss their experiences studying abroad in Jordan, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates. They will reflect on how their studies changed their understandings of the region, which experiences outside the classroom were most impactful, what they learned about themselves as they navigated this new cultural context, as well as offer advice to other intrepid students interested in studying in this vital region.

 Wood 11:00
Sponsor: Jennifer Esperanza

Melissa Pelkey '19
Franklin, Wisconsin
Major: Biochemistry

Volunteering in Guatemalan Health Care

 During the summer of 2016, I lived in the village of Santa Cruz in La Laguna, Guatemala and participated in a medical Spanish program. Each day, I worked in a clinic while also receiving lessons on medical Spanish, medical topics we saw in the clinic, and how the local culture affected our approaches to healthcare. In the clinic, my job was to take an initial patient history including symptoms, concerns and brief physical exam. I would then present the case to the head physician, who would assess the patient and give a final diagnosis. Aside from this unparalleled medical training experience, working on my Spanish fluency, and gaining experiences with patient interaction, the most important takeaway I received from this program was how culture affects medicine. This presentation will explore how the people in Santa Cruz view westernized medicine. For example, medication and injections given at the clinic are viewed in a completely different way than how patients in America might interpret them. I will discuss how local culture affects the way treatments are understood and evaluated by the patients. Overall, the experience was an incredible opportunity for me to grow academically and personally as well as develop a more informed world view.

 Richardson 3:00
Sponsor: Kylie Quave

Claire Metztli Ramos '19
Chicago, Illinois
Major: Undeclared
Minor: Undeclared

Global Migration: Case Studies in France and Southern Mexico

 During the 2015-2016 school year, I took a focused gap year to explore issues surrounding migration. I volunteered at La 72, a migrant shelter in Tenosique, Tabasco on Mexico’s southern border with Guatemala and at a refugee camp in northern France named Utopia56.

 My participation in these two places was inspired by a No More Deaths trip I went on during my freshman year at Beloit College. My experiences on two continents opened my eyes to the international migration crisis that the world is facing today.

 La 72 is the first stop in Tabasco where Central American migrants can find shelter when they cross into Mexico. Hondurans fleeing gang violence at home make up the largest majority of the population at the migrant house, followed by Salvadorans. La 72 is a project of the Franciscan Brothers and funded by donations.

 In France, the camp housed refugees that were fleeing ISIS-held territories. Only 10 minutes away from the "Jungle of Calais", the camp was strictly for Kurdish people who had been moved from the Calais camp. This camp was under the jurisdiction of the local government and MSF (Doctors Without Borders).

 The work for both was similar as much as it was different. The specific contexts causing these mass migrations are different but the desire for a life without violence is the same.

 Coming back to Beloit after a year filled with heavy learning experiences, I’ve decided to shift my focus to International Relations where I can get more of a background on the things that I saw and learned. When I finish my time at Beloit, I want to dedicate myself to working at an NGO where I can continue this type of work to help people in need. Human rights are an essential part of life and should be granted to everyone. Working with these types of organizations is not difficult; these places are all around the world, it is just a matter of being exposed to the possibility, something that all Beloit students’ should take advantage of if interested.

 Wood 1:05
Sponsor: Theodore Gries

Grace Marin Reynolds '17
San Antonio, Texas
Majors: Biochemistry; Music
Minor: Spanish

Designing Drugs for Dengue and Other Tropical Diseases in Ecuador

 Dengue is a disease that affects almost 400 million people each year. Although a vaccine exists as of December 2015, it does not fully protect people from all 4 variations of this disease and it cannot be used on the populations that are the most vulnerable.

  During my time abroad, I participated as a part the Latitude Zero Ecuador Research Initiative to help characterize a protein that is important for the life cycle of Dengue in order to suggest new target sites for drug design. The process of creating a drug for a disease is a long and complicated one. My research was a part of the first step in this process. Before a drug can be created, the virus or bacteria itself must be studied. I was a part of a team that is studying the dengue virus in order to find an area of the structure that is able to be attacked and disabled by a drug.

 Using two computational methods, phyre2 and docking, we were able to confirm the identities of several important residues that could be possible targets for future drug design. These residues are specific spots on the dengue virus that are crucial for its function. If one of these spots were to be disabled by a drug, the virus would not be able to function properly. The same computational methods were also used to begin study on a lesser known tropical disease called Chikungunya.

  I first heard of Chikungunya through my work as part of a Timmy Medical Brigade that traveled to Santo Domingo, Ecuador. Timmy is a program that brings year round quality healthcare to communities in need. For a week, I worked as a medical interpreter between spanish speaking patients and english speaking doctors. During this time, we served many communities that one year prior had an outbreak of the Chikungunya virus. I chose to study this disease after seeings patients, primarily children, who were still suffering from the effects of this disease.

 Wood 9:30
Sponsor: Nancy Krusko

Julia Ring '18
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Major: Anthropology
Minor: Museum Studies

Transformative Outdoor Education through the Yukon Territory, Canada

 In this day and age, choosing to go off the grid away from phones, showers, email and responsibilities is becoming more and more difficult. For thirty days this past summer, I cut all ties from the modern world and disappeared into the backwoods of the Yukon Territory of Canada where I spent my time backpacking and canoeing with the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS).

 During my month of scaling mountains with fifty pound backpacks and run ins with grizzly bears, I was also undertaking an ethnographic study, looking at the motivations, impact, and benefits of outdoor education based on previous NOLS studies. Through first hand experience, and surveys, the completion of my research is complete with the goal of furthering both access and funding for outdoor education. In this presentation, I hope to stimulate interest in NOLS programs to others who who may not think they would have use for a wilderness course or those who could not afford it.

 Through photos and journal entries, come visit the Land of the Midnight Sun while learning more about what a cross-discipline NOLS course is like, what my research unearthed, and how difficult it is to transition back into the real world after living such a simple life.

 Wood 10:35
Sponsor: Yaffa Grossman
César Sánchez; Geovanny Herrera Valverde (Associated Colleges of the Midwest)

Emily Sneed '17
Prairie Village, Kansas
Major: Ecology, Evolution, and Behavioral Biology

Perezosos y Pura Vida: Experiences with Costa Rican culture and independent field research

 I chose the Associated Colleges of the Midwest (ACM) Costa Rica: Field Research in the Environment, Social Sciences, & Humanities in order to experience designing and implementing an independent, semester-long research project, and I found my abroad experience to be both scholastically and personally fulfilling.

 I studied female brown-throated three-toed and Hoffmann’s two-toed sloths in and around an organic cacao farm in northeastern Costa Rica. For two months, I utilized radio telemetry to re-encounter a number of female sloths, noted their movements and habitat use, and analyzed the behavioral preferences between females with and without dependent juveniles. Each individual sloth proved to be a case study in and of itself, and I found myself well acquainted with the challenges of working with wild animals in their natural, arboreal habitat.

 While I found the project to be rewarding, I want to emphasize the importance of the abroad experience. Living with two different host families in two locations and conversing in a foreign language offered its own set of obstacles. Studying abroad also opened my eyes towards the ideas of ecotourism. Costa Rica is known for being environmentally sustainable and offering a paradise for travelers, but I was struck by the lack of environmental awareness. I found that organic, “green” spaces were highly concentrated in tourist hot spots. This juxtaposition sparked a new desire to study sustainability and ecotourism. I will share my pre-departure expectations and how they compared to both my cultural and research experience and offer advice and insight to those who are considering studying abroad. As an ACM Ambassador, I will also briefly outline the different study abroad programs that are available.

 Richardson 1:05
Sponsor: Jennifer Esperanza

Madeline Stein '17
Evanston, Illinois
Major: Education
Minor: Anthropology

The Gentrification of London Boroughs

 During the 2015-2016 school year, I was given the extraordinary opportunity to study abroad in the South-East London neighborhood of New Cross. During my nine months spent in London, I witnessed gentrification happening in not only the neighborhood I was living in, but also throughout London as a whole. People (minorities from West Africa, the Middle East and India) who had been living in these neighborhoods for years were being forced out of their own homes as a result of an exponentially increasing price for rent. In this presentation, I will discuss one of the most well-known cases of gentrification: Shoreditch, located in the borough of Hackney. As a result of gentrification, Shoreditch has become increasingly more expensive and many local shops and restaurants have been forced to close after large retailers opened stores. Shoreditch, originally a primarily Jewish neighborhood, has a rich cultural background and has transformed to become a trendy, posh and family un-friendly place to live. I was able to spend a sufficient amount of time in Shoreditch and talk to locals about their opinion on the effects that gentrification has on both Shoreditch and London as a whole. I will use my observations and stories to examine the phenomenon of gentrification in order to understand the changing socioeconomic climate in London.

 SC150 1:30
Sponsor: Susan Furukawa

Jeremy Sullivan '17
Ashburn, Virginia
Major: Japanese
Minor: Critical Identity Studies

Diverse Foreigners in the Rural North of Homogeneous Japan

 It is often thought that in Japan all foreigners experience the same type of discrimination regardless of their place of origin. However, what if this way of thinking ignored the influence of Western popular media throughout the world, and with it, the perpetuation of a European standard of beauty that caused an unequal perception and treatment of foreigners that aren’t of European descent by the general Japanese population that continues today? While I’d been told that the treatment is the same towards all foreigners before I arrived in Japan, the informants were all either white or Japanese.

 In addition to using my own experiences as being a minority in both Japan and in the United States, I found it important to connect with foreigners that were not only minorities once they arrived in Japan, but also minorities in their home countries because they would be able to identify micro-aggressions and other subtle discrimination that majority groups would typically be unable to identify. In order to discover the depth of the difference in treatment between white foreigners and foreigners of other races and ethnicities on a small and personal scale, I conducted a series of interviews with Akita International University students that came from various areas in the world, inquiring about life in their home country versus Japan, specifically the difference in discrimination faced, if experienced, between Japan and their homes. I also examined a documentary about the lives of various black people and how they perceive their experiences in Japan. In my presentation, I will analyze this material and talk about it in comparison to my own experience in Japan with the goal of understanding blackness in a world context.

 Richardson 2:35
Sponsor: Constantine Hadavas

Hannah Taft '17
Kansas City, Missouri
Major: Classical Philology
Minor: Critical Identities Studies

Pausanias at Kenchreai: What Was Written and What Remains

 The Greek traveler Pausanias wrote of the unusual sites and objects of ritual he came across in Greece during the 2nd century AD in a collection known simply as Description of Greece. The accuracy of his accounts regarding the placement and even existence of these attractions, however, is regarded by most modern historians to be questionable at best. While working at the Kenchreai Archaeological Field School this past summer, I was able to retrace Pausanias’ visit to the town. Although Kenchreai always functioned as a port to the larger city of Corinth, during its time as a Roman colony it became one of the busiest harbors in the eastern Mediterranean. Its inhabitants were Greeks, Romans, and peoples from the eastern part of the Roman Empire who possessed diverse religious views and socio-economic statuses. By combining Pausanias’ description, the material remains that are still present, and my own research and observations, I will explore the history of Kenchreai and the role it played in the Isthmus of Corinth during the 2nd century and attempt to answer the following: How did the town change over time? What deities were worshipped there? Did its inhabitants identify as Greek or Roman? And finally, how accurate is Pausanias’ portrayal of Kenchreai?

 SC150 9:30
Sponsors: Susan Furukawa and Joy Beckman

Jasmine Vasquez '16
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Major: Psychology
Minors: Critical Identity Studies; Japanese

Why Survivors of Japanese WWII Tragedies Retell Their Stories

 Japan suffered many tragedies in WWII: air raids, where everyone had to run to shelters and hope everyone could make it before the bombs were dropped, most notably, the Great Tokyo Air Raid, where some people survived only because they were at the bottom of a heap of corpses; comfort stations, where girls were kidnapped and then raped repeatedly by soldiers for years, often violently, and many finally returned home only to be turned away by their families in shame; and of course, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, where people were going about their day and suddenly, after a flash of light and an explosion, hundreds of thousands of people were dead or mortally wounded, and survivors still feel both the physical effects in the form of cancers and the emotional repercussions of surviving amidst the huge losses of life.

 What I saw was that many survivors choose to put themselves in positions where they retell their stories repeatedly. For example, this may be as an employee who speaks in a museum, as an artist, or as someone who volunteers to speak at schools about their experiences. Every time they tell their story, it brings back the painful memories. I began to wonder why they chose to put themselves in these situations.

 In Japan, I had the opportunity to look at peace museums and to speak with some of these survivors, and I learned immensely from this. In my symposium, I will discuss their experiences, the general Japanese education on WWII tragedies, and my conclusions on why they share their stories. Please note that these stories include graphic content.

 Wood 9:05
Sponsor: Pablo Toral

Alex Villegas '19
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
Majors: International Relations; Modern Languages
Minor: Law and Justice

David E. Ortiz '17
Chicago, Illinois
Majors: Environmental Studies; Justice and Citizenship
Minor: English

Selective Beauty: Environmental Injustice in the Boundary Waters

 The 1964 Wilderness Act states that all designated wilderness sites and national parks shall be accessible to “...the American people of present and future generations”. However, during our month-long expedition into the Boundary Waters/Quetico Wilderness, the most poignant realization our team came away with was the wide gap between what was stated in legislation and the reality of the situation.

 To build upon this observation, we explore the issue of environmental racism in both American and Canadian politics, visible through discriminatory placement of low-income American Indian reservations and the blatant absence of minority groups within and around the Wilderness. By explaining the context and repercussions of race relations within the Boundary Waters/Quetico area, our team hopes to reveal the complex and interconnected history of environmental racism and injustice that has engulfed the area for most of its existence. Afterwards, our team will delve into the concept of fair representation for American Indian/First Nation communities as the root of how to begin addressing environmental injustice, creating a snowball effect of better access to public institutions and the policymaking agendas of both countries.

 SC349 11:00
Sponsor: Sylvia Lopez

Paige Waterstreet '16
Tampa, Florida
Majors: Spanish; Anthropology

Shifting Faith in Granada, Spain

 Though having a reputation as a very Catholic country, Spain has seen in recent years a significant decrease in the active practice of the religion. While 73% of the population identifies as Catholic, less than half actively practice Catholicism. Most Spaniards only maintain their ties to the religion through cultural observance of Catholic values and traditions. This is especially true for the young population of the country.

 Over the summer, I spent four weeks in Granada, Spain attending biweekly services at various Catholic churches and interviewing college students about changing religiosity in order to determine how age and current politics affect active religious observance. Though the Church’s growing negative reputation in the country made it difficult to encounter interviewees; in the end, I was able to speak with ten individuals whose perspectives led me to understand that a complex group of factors are causing the shift from active to cultural practice of Catholicism in the city.

 Wood 11:25
Sponsor: Paul Stanley

Yolanda (Yaodan) Zhang '18
Shanghai, China
Majors: Mathematics; Economics

Adventures in Guatemala: City, Village, Culture and Maya people

 In the summer of 2016, I went on an adventure to Guatemala and explored the country by traveling and volunteering. Being in the country without the knowledge of the local language increased uncertainties; however, it made my journey more exciting. The kind people that I met throughout my trip made it an interesting adventure with a smooth finish because of the assistance they offered. I visited the volcanoes in Antigua and the beautiful Lake Atitlán; I saw the amazing sunrise at Indian Nose and wandered the Maya Chichicastenango market; and I enjoyed other fabulous scenery all the while interacting with local people.

 After touring the southern part of Guatemala as a backpacker, I went across the country to the northern area of Petén, where my volunteer project was to be. I thought that my volunteer experience would be exciting just like the earlier portion of my the trip, but it turned out to be a project quite different from how it was described on the website. Adapting to the situation, I moved to live with a local Maya family, learned to make avocado oil and recognize plants for medicinal purposes, cooked with Maya people, helped in a local school, and experienced the Maya people’s daily life.

 Putting the liberal arts in practice, I explored the Maya history and culture from the local people’s perspective, I cultivated basic living skills in a rural village, I learned to adapt myself to unexpected challenges, and I transferred my class-learned knowledge into looking into the economic status of Guatemala. For me, Guatemala still needs to be explored further and I am considering ways to develop my understanding and appreciation of this rich culture.

Funding for International Opportunities for Beloit College students

Funding for study abroad
  • Study Abroad Enhancement Grants (for projects undertaken during study abroad) lead to a better understanding of the lived realities of the host culture(s) through experiential learning activities. See: http://www.beloit.edu/oie/. May be applied for in either the fall or spring semester.
  • Benjamin Gilman Scholarships support costs associated with study abroad for Pell Grant recipients. See http://www.iie.org/programs/gilman-scholarship-program. Applications are due the semester prior to the study abroad.
  • Class of 2008, Burris, Schroeder and Luke Somers Scholarships for off-campus study. For Beloit College students with significant financial need. No application required.
  • Boren Scholarship for the study of less commonly-taught languages in world regions considered critical to U.S. interests. U.S. citizenship required. See: https://www.borenawards.org/boren_scholarship/basics.htm. Applications are due in January.
  • Scholarships made available by study abroad organizations to students enrolling in these organizations' study abroad programs. See individual program information.
  • Funding for summer projects
    The grants and fellowships listed below are administered by the Initiatives Program, Office of International Education, and the Liberal Arts in Practice Center. Some are exclusively for international opportunities and all of them use a Common Application. See: http://www.beloit.edu/lapc/funding/beloitonly/. The deadline for the Common Application is the Monday after Spring Break. Information about other funding opportunities can be found at https://www.beloit.edu/lapc/funding/.
  • International Education Grant for projects that "enable students to apply their studies to an international context"
  • Weissberg Human Rights Grant for off-campus research, internships and conference attendance in the field of human rights
  • Venture Grant for current sophomores to participate in entrepreneurial, self-testing, or intellectually challenging projects that benefit both the student(s) involved and others. Projects may be of a personal, service, or commercial character, and may be completed independently or through an organization.
  • Bacon Super-Vision Fellowship for participating in any low-paid or unpaid summer internship.
  • Class of 1986 Field Experience Fellowship for current juniors participating in any low-paid or unpaid summer internship.
  • Mikva-Cohen Endowed Internship Fund for pursuing intensive summer internships with a preference for experiential opportunities in three areas: performing arts, social justice activism, and practical politics.
  • Martha and Alan Stutz Grant Fund awarded for travel and research abroad, living expenses associated with summer internships, off-campus research and travel. While open to students in all disciplines, preference is given to students in Art History, Anthropology and/or Museum Studies who will commit to presenting at the Student Symposium.
  • Society for Learning Unlimited Grant for Internships or Community-based Research for community-based academic study during the summer or academic year.
  • Kohler Fund for Community Engagement for educational opportunities that encourage community engagement for students and faculty, such as, but not limited to internships.

  • Many of the students presenting in this International Symposium received funding for their projects and studies from one of these sources. Thanks are due to the donors who make these opportunities possible.

    The Symposium is organized by George Lisensky, Chemistry Department, with special thanks to Sarah Arnsmeier.

    The word cloud was created by G. Lisensky using the Symposium abstracts and www.wordle.net. The larger the font for a given word, the more frequently that word appears in the abstracts.

    Link to the online program

    See pdf abstracts: